Walking Program for Midlife African American (AA) Women: Reasons for Nonparticipation in 24- or 48-week assessments

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159210
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Walking Program for Midlife African American (AA) Women: Reasons for Nonparticipation in 24- or 48-week assessments
Abstract:
Walking Program for Midlife African American (AA) Women: Reasons for Nonparticipation in 24- or 48-week assessments
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Ju, Sukyung, Doctoral Student
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Chicago, IL, 60616, USA
Co-Authors:H. Lee, J. McDevitt, E. Wang, D. Ingram, and J. Wilbur, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL
Missed assessments is a common phenomenon in clinical trials. According to the CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials) statement, clinical trials should convey, in a transparent manner, the number of participants in each group included in each analysis. This involves tracking of all missed assessments and documenting the reasons. The purpose of this study is to describe the reasons that midlife AA women participating in a home-based moderate intensity walking program did not return for scheduled assessments at week 24, 48, or both. Either an enhanced treatment (ET) or a standard treatment (ST) was assigned to one of two community health centers located in predominately AA low-income communities. During an adoption phase (weeks 1-24), the ET group attended 4 weekly workshops followed by 11 personalized phone calls and 1-3 face-to-face visits. During a maintenance phase (weeks 25-48), women were supported with tapered phone calls only. The ST group had 1 face-to-face visit only during adoption. All women received an individualized prescription for walking at moderate intensity for three 30-minute sessions/week. Both ET and ST groups were scheduled to return for questionnaires and physiological assessments at week 24 and 48. Reasons for missed assessments were obtained when the telephone call was made to set the assessment appointments or during the follow-up phone call when appointments were missed. 281 sedentary AA women aged 40-65 who met the screening criteria participated in the Women's Walking Program. Of the participants, 79% were either obese or very obese; 34% had hypertension; and 12% had diabetes. 65% completed the 24-week assessments and 61% completed the 48-week assessments. Of the 98 women who missed the 24-week assessment, 41% returned for the 48-week assessment. The number of women who missed assessments was greater at both 24 and 48 weeks for the ST than the ET. The most common reason for nonparticipation in both 24 and 48 assessments was health problems (34% & 31%, respectively) followed by work demands (22% & 21%, respectively). Findings highlight the impact of health problems and time constraints on these midlife AA women's ability to complete data collection assessments for a clinical trial.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWalking Program for Midlife African American (AA) Women: Reasons for Nonparticipation in 24- or 48-week assessmentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159210-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Walking Program for Midlife African American (AA) Women: Reasons for Nonparticipation in 24- or 48-week assessments</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ju, Sukyung, Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Chicago, IL, 60616, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sju2@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">H. Lee, J. McDevitt, E. Wang, D. Ingram, and J. Wilbur, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Missed assessments is a common phenomenon in clinical trials. According to the CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials) statement, clinical trials should convey, in a transparent manner, the number of participants in each group included in each analysis. This involves tracking of all missed assessments and documenting the reasons. The purpose of this study is to describe the reasons that midlife AA women participating in a home-based moderate intensity walking program did not return for scheduled assessments at week 24, 48, or both. Either an enhanced treatment (ET) or a standard treatment (ST) was assigned to one of two community health centers located in predominately AA low-income communities. During an adoption phase (weeks 1-24), the ET group attended 4 weekly workshops followed by 11 personalized phone calls and 1-3 face-to-face visits. During a maintenance phase (weeks 25-48), women were supported with tapered phone calls only. The ST group had 1 face-to-face visit only during adoption. All women received an individualized prescription for walking at moderate intensity for three 30-minute sessions/week. Both ET and ST groups were scheduled to return for questionnaires and physiological assessments at week 24 and 48. Reasons for missed assessments were obtained when the telephone call was made to set the assessment appointments or during the follow-up phone call when appointments were missed. 281 sedentary AA women aged 40-65 who met the screening criteria participated in the Women's Walking Program. Of the participants, 79% were either obese or very obese; 34% had hypertension; and 12% had diabetes. 65% completed the 24-week assessments and 61% completed the 48-week assessments. Of the 98 women who missed the 24-week assessment, 41% returned for the 48-week assessment. The number of women who missed assessments was greater at both 24 and 48 weeks for the ST than the ET. The most common reason for nonparticipation in both 24 and 48 assessments was health problems (34% &amp; 31%, respectively) followed by work demands (22% &amp; 21%, respectively). Findings highlight the impact of health problems and time constraints on these midlife AA women's ability to complete data collection assessments for a clinical trial.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:48:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:48:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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