2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159211
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Engaging in Being There: Becoming a Mother in Middle Adolescence
Abstract:
Engaging in Being There: Becoming a Mother in Middle Adolescence
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2007
Author:Kaiser, Margaret, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA
Psychosocial influences that affect any transition experience vary among individuals and contribute to differences observed in transition outcomes. Transition to motherhood in first-time pregnant adolescents is not experienced uniformly and reasons for this individual variation are not well understood. The emergence of qualitative research related to adolescent parenting has uncovered some of the complexities inherent in pregnant and parenting adolescents' lives yet few qualitative studies have explored the experience of becoming a mother in adolescence over time (prenatal and postpartum). The purpose of this longitudinal qualitative study was to explore the experience of becoming a mother for the first time in middle adolescence (15-18 years). The sample included 19 unmarried first-time pregnant adolescents intending to keep their infants. The mean age was 17 years with 58% being Caucasian (n=11), 32 % African American (n=6), and 10% Hispanic (n=2). Participants completed a brief demographic questionnaire and an audio taped semi-structured interview during pregnancy (Time 1) and at 2 months postpartum (Time 2). A total of 34 interviews were completed; 19 during pregnancy and 15 when the infant was two months of age. The interviews were transcribed verbatim. Content analysis included line by line coding of interviews, memos, a data matrix display, and identification of themes. The central theme identified was "Engaging in Being There," which involved: 1) Identifying with Motherhood (Resolving Ideal with Real, Emerging Role, Developing Attachment), 2) Securing a Caring Foundation (Restructuring, Seeking Help, Reflecting), and 3) Overcoming Uncertainty (Developing self-confidence, Having Hope, and Developing a Sense of Responsibility). The results identified factors that influence the transition to motherhood that are unique to middle adolescence. Understanding these factors associated with the transition experience will help explain different times of vulnerability in which nursing interventions can be targeted.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEngaging in Being There: Becoming a Mother in Middle Adolescenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159211-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Engaging in Being There: Becoming a Mother in Middle Adolescence</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kaiser, Margaret, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mkaiser@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Psychosocial influences that affect any transition experience vary among individuals and contribute to differences observed in transition outcomes. Transition to motherhood in first-time pregnant adolescents is not experienced uniformly and reasons for this individual variation are not well understood. The emergence of qualitative research related to adolescent parenting has uncovered some of the complexities inherent in pregnant and parenting adolescents' lives yet few qualitative studies have explored the experience of becoming a mother in adolescence over time (prenatal and postpartum). The purpose of this longitudinal qualitative study was to explore the experience of becoming a mother for the first time in middle adolescence (15-18 years). The sample included 19 unmarried first-time pregnant adolescents intending to keep their infants. The mean age was 17 years with 58% being Caucasian (n=11), 32 % African American (n=6), and 10% Hispanic (n=2). Participants completed a brief demographic questionnaire and an audio taped semi-structured interview during pregnancy (Time 1) and at 2 months postpartum (Time 2). A total of 34 interviews were completed; 19 during pregnancy and 15 when the infant was two months of age. The interviews were transcribed verbatim. Content analysis included line by line coding of interviews, memos, a data matrix display, and identification of themes. The central theme identified was &quot;Engaging in Being There,&quot; which involved: 1) Identifying with Motherhood (Resolving Ideal with Real, Emerging Role, Developing Attachment), 2) Securing a Caring Foundation (Restructuring, Seeking Help, Reflecting), and 3) Overcoming Uncertainty (Developing self-confidence, Having Hope, and Developing a Sense of Responsibility). The results identified factors that influence the transition to motherhood that are unique to middle adolescence. Understanding these factors associated with the transition experience will help explain different times of vulnerability in which nursing interventions can be targeted.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:48:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:48:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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