2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159214
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Literacy in Urban Medically Underserved Clinics
Abstract:
Health Literacy in Urban Medically Underserved Clinics
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Garvin, Bonnie, PhD, MS, BSN, RN
Title:Professor
Contact Address:CON, 585 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA
Co-Authors:Doris Walzak, MD, Medical Director
Low health literacy is an enormous barrier to optimal health care. According to self-regulation theory, patients cope by processing information related to their health. Nationally, low health literacy is an expensive and pervasive problem in nearly 75% of persons who are older, of color, with disabilities, and in poverty. The purpose of this study was to collect baseline data on health literacy in inner city clinics in patients most vulnerable to health disparities. To identify issues that health care providers and staff relate to low health literacy, three focus groups were conducted. Two research assistants recorded verbatim the comments during the focus group. Data from all focus groups were merged and summarized. The largest group in all of the participants (n=45) was physicians, followed by medical assistants, registered nurses, administration, clerical and billing, and advanced practice nurses. There were more females than males and most respondents were Black. Themes included identification of low health literacy, assessing what patients already know, influence of culture on health literacy, the use of multiple teaching methods, the importance of medication teaching, and the use of the dietician and pharmacist for health teaching. To examine the reading level of materials used in the clinics, ten patient education materials were randomly selected from materials available to patients. After training in the use of the Fry Readability Scale and establishing interrater reliability (100%), two research assistants independently assessed the reading level of the patient education materials. The range of the reading levels was from the 7th - 17th grade. The average reading level was the 12th grade. This project will provide baseline data for a model program to increase awareness and capacity of health care providers regarding low health literacy.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Literacy in Urban Medically Underserved Clinicsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159214-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Literacy in Urban Medically Underserved Clinics</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Garvin, Bonnie, PhD, MS, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 585 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Doris Walzak, MD, Medical Director </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Low health literacy is an enormous barrier to optimal health care. According to self-regulation theory, patients cope by processing information related to their health. Nationally, low health literacy is an expensive and pervasive problem in nearly 75% of persons who are older, of color, with disabilities, and in poverty. The purpose of this study was to collect baseline data on health literacy in inner city clinics in patients most vulnerable to health disparities. To identify issues that health care providers and staff relate to low health literacy, three focus groups were conducted. Two research assistants recorded verbatim the comments during the focus group. Data from all focus groups were merged and summarized. The largest group in all of the participants (n=45) was physicians, followed by medical assistants, registered nurses, administration, clerical and billing, and advanced practice nurses. There were more females than males and most respondents were Black. Themes included identification of low health literacy, assessing what patients already know, influence of culture on health literacy, the use of multiple teaching methods, the importance of medication teaching, and the use of the dietician and pharmacist for health teaching. To examine the reading level of materials used in the clinics, ten patient education materials were randomly selected from materials available to patients. After training in the use of the Fry Readability Scale and establishing interrater reliability (100%), two research assistants independently assessed the reading level of the patient education materials. The range of the reading levels was from the 7th - 17th grade. The average reading level was the 12th grade. This project will provide baseline data for a model program to increase awareness and capacity of health care providers regarding low health literacy. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:48:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:48:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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