2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159217
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Fitness and Long-Term Exercise Following a Cardiac Rehabilitation Program
Abstract:
Fitness and Long-Term Exercise Following a Cardiac Rehabilitation Program
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Guo, Su-Er, MSN, RN
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton SON, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Co-Authors:Shirley M. Moore, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Dean & Associate Professor; Jacqueline M. Charvat, BS, Project Manager
Fitness is associated with exercise in many populations; however, it is not clear whether or not fitness is related to long-term exercise in cardiac patients. A predictive correlational design was used to determine the relationship between fitness and exercise of cardiac patients over a 6-month period. A convenience sample of 128 individuals (48 women, 80 men) who completed a cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP) was followed for 6 months. Using wristwatch heart rate monitors, the frequency, amount (# of hours exercised), length of exercise sessions, and intensity compliance (percent of exercise time spent in target heart rate zone) were measured. Fitness was measured at completion of the CRP using the Six-Minutes Walk Test. Subjects were primarily Caucasian (77.3%), married (67.9%), with a mean age of 63 years. Significant associations were found between fitness and exercise amount (r=.30, p=.001), frequency (r=.28, p=.002), and duration (r=.27, p=.03). No significant association was found between fitness and intensity compliance. Using hierarchical multiple regression, fitness predicted the frequency (£]=.27, t=2.5, p=.02) and amount (£]=.25, t=2.3, p=.03) of exercise when controlling for the effects of the covariates age, gender, abdominal girth, co-morbidity (Charlson scale), NYHA class, and muscle and joint pain, accounting for 5 % and 4% of the variance, respectively. Fitness was not a significant predictor of exercise duration or intensity compliance. These results suggest that fitness is related to some dimensions of exercise in cardiac patients, but not others. A surprising finding is that fitness is not related to intensity of exercise or duration of exercise sessions. The inclusion of behavioral and psychosocial variables in models predicting exercise maintenance may further our understanding of this difficult health-promoting behavior.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFitness and Long-Term Exercise Following a Cardiac Rehabilitation Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159217-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Fitness and Long-Term Exercise Following a Cardiac Rehabilitation Program </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Guo, Su-Er, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton SON, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Shirley M. Moore, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Dean &amp; Associate Professor; Jacqueline M. Charvat, BS, Project Manager </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Fitness is associated with exercise in many populations; however, it is not clear whether or not fitness is related to long-term exercise in cardiac patients. A predictive correlational design was used to determine the relationship between fitness and exercise of cardiac patients over a 6-month period. A convenience sample of 128 individuals (48 women, 80 men) who completed a cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP) was followed for 6 months. Using wristwatch heart rate monitors, the frequency, amount (# of hours exercised), length of exercise sessions, and intensity compliance (percent of exercise time spent in target heart rate zone) were measured. Fitness was measured at completion of the CRP using the Six-Minutes Walk Test. Subjects were primarily Caucasian (77.3%), married (67.9%), with a mean age of 63 years. Significant associations were found between fitness and exercise amount (r=.30, p=.001), frequency (r=.28, p=.002), and duration (r=.27, p=.03). No significant association was found between fitness and intensity compliance. Using hierarchical multiple regression, fitness predicted the frequency (&pound;]=.27, t=2.5, p=.02) and amount (&pound;]=.25, t=2.3, p=.03) of exercise when controlling for the effects of the covariates age, gender, abdominal girth, co-morbidity (Charlson scale), NYHA class, and muscle and joint pain, accounting for 5 % and 4% of the variance, respectively. Fitness was not a significant predictor of exercise duration or intensity compliance. These results suggest that fitness is related to some dimensions of exercise in cardiac patients, but not others. A surprising finding is that fitness is not related to intensity of exercise or duration of exercise sessions. The inclusion of behavioral and psychosocial variables in models predicting exercise maintenance may further our understanding of this difficult health-promoting behavior.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:48:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:48:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.