For the chronically critically ill, are there differences in weaning outcomes based on nutritional status?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159218
Type:
Presentation
Title:
For the chronically critically ill, are there differences in weaning outcomes based on nutritional status?
Abstract:
For the chronically critically ill, are there differences in weaning outcomes based on nutritional status?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Guo, Su-Er, MSN, RN
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton SON, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA
Co-Authors:Patricia A. Higgins, RN, PhD, Assistant Professor; Amy Lipson, PhD, Projector Manager
Mechanically ventilated patients who are malnourished can develop infections or respiratory problems, and weaning these patients can be difficult if they are over or under-fed. Optimally, feeding formulae (calories and protein, carbohydrate, and fat composition) should be adjusted to meet requirements and maximize the efficiency of gas exchange. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine initial nutritional status and weaning outcomes of 149 chronically critically ill patients (age 61 +/- 16 years). Nutritional status was defined as percent of goal calories received/24 hours and percent of protein, carbohydrate, and fat received/24 hours in their first week of weaning. At discharge, 123 (82.6%) patients successfully weaned, 4 (2.7 %) required partial ventilation support, and 22 (14.8 %) required continuous ventilator support. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups (successfully versus unsuccessfully weaned) for admission albumin /pre-albumin, BMI, APACHE III, pre-weaning phase, weaning duration, or length of stay. Nutritional data indicate that 105 (70.5 %) received enteral nutrition only, 2 (1.3%) received parenteral nutrition only, 4 (2.7%) received both, and 38 (25.5 %) received no form of supplemental nutritional support. A dietitian had written nutritional recommendations for 78.9%, and 51.6 % received their recommended goal. On average, patients received 1080 calories/ 24 hrs; 16.5% protein, 42.4% carbohydrate and 41.6% fat. There were no statistically significant differences in weaning outcome, the mean number calories patients received or percent of protein, carbohydrate, or fat, and type of nutritional feedings during the first week of weaning. Although not statistically significant, patients who were unsuccessful in weaning were older, had lower albumin or prealbumin values, and required 3.6 more days of ventilator support. These data indicate that initial nutrition status is not a factor in weaning. Longitudinal analysis is needed to further explore the role of nutritional support and weaning.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFor the chronically critically ill, are there differences in weaning outcomes based on nutritional status?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159218-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">For the chronically critically ill, are there differences in weaning outcomes based on nutritional status? </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Guo, Su-Er, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton SON, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Patricia A. Higgins, RN, PhD, Assistant Professor; Amy Lipson, PhD, Projector Manager </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Mechanically ventilated patients who are malnourished can develop infections or respiratory problems, and weaning these patients can be difficult if they are over or under-fed. Optimally, feeding formulae (calories and protein, carbohydrate, and fat composition) should be adjusted to meet requirements and maximize the efficiency of gas exchange. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine initial nutritional status and weaning outcomes of 149 chronically critically ill patients (age 61 +/- 16 years). Nutritional status was defined as percent of goal calories received/24 hours and percent of protein, carbohydrate, and fat received/24 hours in their first week of weaning. At discharge, 123 (82.6%) patients successfully weaned, 4 (2.7 %) required partial ventilation support, and 22 (14.8 %) required continuous ventilator support. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups (successfully versus unsuccessfully weaned) for admission albumin /pre-albumin, BMI, APACHE III, pre-weaning phase, weaning duration, or length of stay. Nutritional data indicate that 105 (70.5 %) received enteral nutrition only, 2 (1.3%) received parenteral nutrition only, 4 (2.7%) received both, and 38 (25.5 %) received no form of supplemental nutritional support. A dietitian had written nutritional recommendations for 78.9%, and 51.6 % received their recommended goal. On average, patients received 1080 calories/ 24 hrs; 16.5% protein, 42.4% carbohydrate and 41.6% fat. There were no statistically significant differences in weaning outcome, the mean number calories patients received or percent of protein, carbohydrate, or fat, and type of nutritional feedings during the first week of weaning. Although not statistically significant, patients who were unsuccessful in weaning were older, had lower albumin or prealbumin values, and required 3.6 more days of ventilator support. These data indicate that initial nutrition status is not a factor in weaning. Longitudinal analysis is needed to further explore the role of nutritional support and weaning. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:48:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:48:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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