2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159223
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Salivary Cortisol as Indicators of Pain in Preterm Infants: A Pilot Study
Abstract:
Salivary Cortisol as Indicators of Pain in Preterm Infants: A Pilot Study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Herrington, Carolyn, MSN, NNP, RNC
Contact Address:Division of Neonatology, 1215 E. Michigan Ave, Lansing, MI, 48909, USA
Co-Authors:Isoken N. Olomu, MD; Sandra M. Geller, MSN, CNS, NNP, RNC
Salivary Cortisol as Indicators of Pain in Preterm Infants: A Pilot Study Abstract Problem: Assessment and management of pain in preterm infants remains critical, despite development of multiple pain assessment tools. The addition of salivary cortisol level measurement may improve the specificity of assessment and help guide measures to alleviate pain. Purpose: The purpose of this study was fourfold: a) assess the feasibility of a method of saliva collection not dependent upon the use of salivation stimulants in premature infants; b) assess reliability of a method of measuring salivary cortisol in response to pain of heelstick; c) identify relationships between salivary cortisol and a measure of pain behavior (using CRIES) following heelstick; and d) identify peak response times for elevations of salivary cortisol following heelstick. Theoretical Framework: Rogers' Science of Unitary Human Beings, and Selye's General Adaptation System provided the theoretical framework for this study. Methods: In a prospective, non-experimental, descriptive pilot study, serial saliva samples were collected around a heelstick required for medical management. The sample consisted of 8 relatively healthy infants ranging from 30 - to 36 weeks gestation in a Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Salivary cortisol levels were determined using enzyme-immune-assay (EIA). Mean salivary cortisol levels were computed to provide peak and trough cortisol response patterns. Pain scores were determined using the CRIES. Results: Samples were successfully collected without use of stimulants. CRIES scores did not correlate with peak cortisol levels and remained below suggested intervention levels. Patterns correlated with previously documented cortisol response patterns. Implications: Improved measures to assess response of minimally painfully, but frequently occurring interventions such as heelstick are needed. Coupling salivary cortisol levels with bio-behavioral responses may provide insight into evaluation of measures designed to reduce effects of pain by capturing changes in the stress response to common pain stimuli in the NICU.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSalivary Cortisol as Indicators of Pain in Preterm Infants: A Pilot Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159223-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Salivary Cortisol as Indicators of Pain in Preterm Infants: A Pilot Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Herrington, Carolyn, MSN, NNP, RNC</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Division of Neonatology, 1215 E. Michigan Ave, Lansing, MI, 48909, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Isoken N. Olomu, MD; Sandra M. Geller, MSN, CNS, NNP, RNC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Salivary Cortisol as Indicators of Pain in Preterm Infants: A Pilot Study Abstract Problem: Assessment and management of pain in preterm infants remains critical, despite development of multiple pain assessment tools. The addition of salivary cortisol level measurement may improve the specificity of assessment and help guide measures to alleviate pain. Purpose: The purpose of this study was fourfold: a) assess the feasibility of a method of saliva collection not dependent upon the use of salivation stimulants in premature infants; b) assess reliability of a method of measuring salivary cortisol in response to pain of heelstick; c) identify relationships between salivary cortisol and a measure of pain behavior (using CRIES) following heelstick; and d) identify peak response times for elevations of salivary cortisol following heelstick. Theoretical Framework: Rogers' Science of Unitary Human Beings, and Selye's General Adaptation System provided the theoretical framework for this study. Methods: In a prospective, non-experimental, descriptive pilot study, serial saliva samples were collected around a heelstick required for medical management. The sample consisted of 8 relatively healthy infants ranging from 30 - to 36 weeks gestation in a Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Salivary cortisol levels were determined using enzyme-immune-assay (EIA). Mean salivary cortisol levels were computed to provide peak and trough cortisol response patterns. Pain scores were determined using the CRIES. Results: Samples were successfully collected without use of stimulants. CRIES scores did not correlate with peak cortisol levels and remained below suggested intervention levels. Patterns correlated with previously documented cortisol response patterns. Implications: Improved measures to assess response of minimally painfully, but frequently occurring interventions such as heelstick are needed. Coupling salivary cortisol levels with bio-behavioral responses may provide insight into evaluation of measures designed to reduce effects of pain by capturing changes in the stress response to common pain stimuli in the NICU.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:49:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:49:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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