2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159224
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Heart Failure Self-Management: A Grounded Theory
Abstract:
Heart Failure Self-Management: A Grounded Theory
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Hicks, Frank, PhD, RN
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Adult Health Nursing - AAC 1064B, 600 S. Paulina Street, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Co-Authors:Penny F. Pierce, PhD, RN; Jan Shanahan, MSN, RN, ACNP; Ms. Karen Stemmer, MSN, RN, ACNP, Nurse Practitioner
Although self-management of heart failure is thought to slow disease progression and prevent hospitalizations, the majority of extant research examines self-management as a phenomenon of adherence or compliance. Few investigations have conceptualized HF self-management as a decision-making process, yet it is clear these individuals have many daily choices to make when caring for their condition. Thus, the aim of this study was to develop a grounded theory of heart failure (HF) self-management decision-making. A total of 30 individuals (15 men, 15 women) were recruited and participated in semi-structured interviews using the constant comparative method. Although these data are currently being further analyzed, several tentative themes have emerged. First, patients often do not think they make decisions about their care, even though they comment on the ‘choices’ that confronted them. Second, self-management decisions are context-dependent and vary according to stage of illness and perceived control over the situation. Third, social support is emerging as a necessary aspect of the self-management process. Indeed, almost every participant indicated that their families and health care providers were essential supports for dealing with HF. Finally, gender appears to play a role in HF self-management decision-making, as well. Specifically, women appeared to play a more active decision-making role in self-management, relied on emotional types of social support, and engaged in self-management because they wish to be able to continue to take care of and enjoy their families. Alternatively, men wish a more collaborative role in self-management decision-making, depend more on tangible sources of social support, such as health care providers, and had as their primary self-management goal maintaining their functional abilities. Although the theory continues to emerge, these findings have significant implications for those who care for these individuals.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHeart Failure Self-Management: A Grounded Theoryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159224-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Heart Failure Self-Management: A Grounded Theory</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hicks, Frank, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Adult Health Nursing - AAC 1064B, 600 S. Paulina Street, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Penny F. Pierce, PhD, RN; Jan Shanahan, MSN, RN, ACNP; Ms. Karen Stemmer, MSN, RN, ACNP, Nurse Practitioner </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Although self-management of heart failure is thought to slow disease progression and prevent hospitalizations, the majority of extant research examines self-management as a phenomenon of adherence or compliance. Few investigations have conceptualized HF self-management as a decision-making process, yet it is clear these individuals have many daily choices to make when caring for their condition. Thus, the aim of this study was to develop a grounded theory of heart failure (HF) self-management decision-making. A total of 30 individuals (15 men, 15 women) were recruited and participated in semi-structured interviews using the constant comparative method. Although these data are currently being further analyzed, several tentative themes have emerged. First, patients often do not think they make decisions about their care, even though they comment on the &lsquo;choices&rsquo; that confronted them. Second, self-management decisions are context-dependent and vary according to stage of illness and perceived control over the situation. Third, social support is emerging as a necessary aspect of the self-management process. Indeed, almost every participant indicated that their families and health care providers were essential supports for dealing with HF. Finally, gender appears to play a role in HF self-management decision-making, as well. Specifically, women appeared to play a more active decision-making role in self-management, relied on emotional types of social support, and engaged in self-management because they wish to be able to continue to take care of and enjoy their families. Alternatively, men wish a more collaborative role in self-management decision-making, depend more on tangible sources of social support, such as health care providers, and had as their primary self-management goal maintaining their functional abilities. Although the theory continues to emerge, these findings have significant implications for those who care for these individuals.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:49:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:49:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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