2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159230
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Spouse Caregiver Transitions: Nursing Home Placement
Abstract:
Spouse Caregiver Transitions: Nursing Home Placement
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Johnson, Lola, DNSc, RN
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:1427 Cascade Street NW, Rochester, MN, 55901, USA
Alzheimer’s disease is a chronic degenerative illness of the central nervous system affecting an increasing number of individuals and families. Frequently, spouses assume the primary caregiver role and provide home-based care. When home-based care becomes too difficult for the spouse caregiver, the care recipient may be placed in a nursing home for continued care. The aim of this descriptive, interpretive, longitudinal study was to gain insight into the lived experience of caregivers placing spouses in nursing homes, and the transitions they experienced two weeks, seven weeks, and twelve weeks following placement. The theoretical/conceptual framework was a combination of transition theory and chronic illness trajectory. The study involved a convenience sample of ten spouse caregivers of individuals with Alzheimer’s disease who recently experienced nursing home placement. This qualitative study evolved from two qualitative pilot studies each involving additional samples of ten spouse caregivers. This research suggests that the spouse caregiver does experience transitions as a result of placing a loved one in a nursing home. Three themes with subcategories were derived from the data. The three themes were: nursing home placement; perceptions; and emotions. Three major transition patterns were identified. The major transition patterns were moving on, progressing slowly, and split-lives.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSpouse Caregiver Transitions: Nursing Home Placementen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159230-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Spouse Caregiver Transitions: Nursing Home Placement </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Johnson, Lola, DNSc, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor </td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1427 Cascade Street NW, Rochester, MN, 55901, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Alzheimer&rsquo;s disease is a chronic degenerative illness of the central nervous system affecting an increasing number of individuals and families. Frequently, spouses assume the primary caregiver role and provide home-based care. When home-based care becomes too difficult for the spouse caregiver, the care recipient may be placed in a nursing home for continued care. The aim of this descriptive, interpretive, longitudinal study was to gain insight into the lived experience of caregivers placing spouses in nursing homes, and the transitions they experienced two weeks, seven weeks, and twelve weeks following placement. The theoretical/conceptual framework was a combination of transition theory and chronic illness trajectory. The study involved a convenience sample of ten spouse caregivers of individuals with Alzheimer&rsquo;s disease who recently experienced nursing home placement. This qualitative study evolved from two qualitative pilot studies each involving additional samples of ten spouse caregivers. This research suggests that the spouse caregiver does experience transitions as a result of placing a loved one in a nursing home. Three themes with subcategories were derived from the data. The three themes were: nursing home placement; perceptions; and emotions. Three major transition patterns were identified. The major transition patterns were moving on, progressing slowly, and split-lives. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:49:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:49:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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