Personal and Community Factors Influencing Transition to Motherhood in Low-Income Pregnant Adolescents

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159231
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Personal and Community Factors Influencing Transition to Motherhood in Low-Income Pregnant Adolescents
Abstract:
Personal and Community Factors Influencing Transition to Motherhood in Low-Income Pregnant Adolescents
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Kaiser, Margaret, PhD, RN, APRN, BC
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:CON, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA
Co-Authors:Teresa L. Barry, MSN, RNC, Public Health Nurse Project Associate; Katherine Laux Kaiser, PhD, APRN, BC, Associate Professor; Laura J. Dugick, RN, Student; Megan Hasley, RN, Student
The purpose of this study is to describe the transition to motherhood in low-income urban pregnant adolescents 15-18 years by examining the relationship between personal (demographic, health behaviors, medical history) and community factors (social support) that influence the transition experience and the outcome indicator of maternal-fetal attachment (MFA). Transition to motherhood is defined as how women prepare for and come to define their role as mother (Barnard & Martell, 1995). Adolescents may experience difficulty with the transition to motherhood because of their level of psychosocial and cognitive development. Understanding factors that influence attachment prenatally is important to future parenting behaviors and is considered primary prevention for altered parenting. This descriptive, correlational study will use existing data (n=261) from a large data set collected for a Medicaid Managed Care (MMC) program between January 2001 and December 2002. Inclusion criteria for the study are: (a) 15-18 years, (b) enrollment in MMC or eligible for enrollment, and (c) being pregnant. Data were collected by public health nurses primarily through telephone assessment and completed as part of the MMC enrollment process. The health assessment instruments, developed by clinical experts, are implemented using standardized training and protocols. Data analysis will include descriptive statistics and chi-square in order to examine the relationships between personal and community factors and the intermediate outcome of MFA. The outcome indicators of maternal-fetal attachment will include selection of a doctor for baby, and whether the pregnant adolescent kept all doctor’s appointments. This research has important implications for nursing because limited research currently exists related to the study of attachment in low-income pregnant adolescents using a conceptual model of transition.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePersonal and Community Factors Influencing Transition to Motherhood in Low-Income Pregnant Adolescentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159231-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Personal and Community Factors Influencing Transition to Motherhood in Low-Income Pregnant Adolescents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kaiser, Margaret, PhD, RN, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Teresa L. Barry, MSN, RNC, Public Health Nurse Project Associate; Katherine Laux Kaiser, PhD, APRN, BC, Associate Professor; Laura J. Dugick, RN, Student; Megan Hasley, RN, Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study is to describe the transition to motherhood in low-income urban pregnant adolescents 15-18 years by examining the relationship between personal (demographic, health behaviors, medical history) and community factors (social support) that influence the transition experience and the outcome indicator of maternal-fetal attachment (MFA). Transition to motherhood is defined as how women prepare for and come to define their role as mother (Barnard &amp; Martell, 1995). Adolescents may experience difficulty with the transition to motherhood because of their level of psychosocial and cognitive development. Understanding factors that influence attachment prenatally is important to future parenting behaviors and is considered primary prevention for altered parenting. This descriptive, correlational study will use existing data (n=261) from a large data set collected for a Medicaid Managed Care (MMC) program between January 2001 and December 2002. Inclusion criteria for the study are: (a) 15-18 years, (b) enrollment in MMC or eligible for enrollment, and (c) being pregnant. Data were collected by public health nurses primarily through telephone assessment and completed as part of the MMC enrollment process. The health assessment instruments, developed by clinical experts, are implemented using standardized training and protocols. Data analysis will include descriptive statistics and chi-square in order to examine the relationships between personal and community factors and the intermediate outcome of MFA. The outcome indicators of maternal-fetal attachment will include selection of a doctor for baby, and whether the pregnant adolescent kept all doctor&rsquo;s appointments. This research has important implications for nursing because limited research currently exists related to the study of attachment in low-income pregnant adolescents using a conceptual model of transition.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:49:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:49:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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