2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159232
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Harbor of Assisted Living: Safe at Anchor in Everyday Decision Making
Abstract:
Harbor of Assisted Living: Safe at Anchor in Everyday Decision Making
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Kennedy, Diane, MN, RN
Contact Address:SON Bldg, 3901 Rainbow Blvd, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA
Co-Authors:Lynn Parsons, MS, RN, Director, Home Care; Eldonna Sylvia, MN, RN, ARNP, FNP, Clinical Assistant Professor; Ali Ammouri, MN, RN, PHD Student
In Western countries, demographic trends clearly indicate an increase in the aging population well into the next century. Due to declining health, many of these elders will benefit from residence in assisted living. Currently, there is limited research about elder experiences in everyday decision making in these settings. The purpose of this study was to explore the experience of everyday decision making of elders in assisted living using a case study approach. The conceptual orientation in the study focused on elders, assisted living, activities of daily living, and everyday decision making. Two research questions guided this qualitative, inductive investigation. What is the experience of a cognitively intact elder in making everyday decisions in assisted living? What is the context that shapes this decision making? Informants for the case study were purposefully selected. Data were collected using observation, formal and informal interviews with elders, care-givers, and family members, and care planning documents. As data collection occurred, qualitative content analysis was done simultaneously to analyze data and inform methodology. Several themes emerged as significant in elder satisfaction with everyday decision making: (a) external connections; (b) internal collaboration; and (c) comfort with self and environment. Strategies for strengthening these contextually relevant factors are discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHarbor of Assisted Living: Safe at Anchor in Everyday Decision Makingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159232-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Harbor of Assisted Living: Safe at Anchor in Everyday Decision Making</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kennedy, Diane, MN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON Bldg, 3901 Rainbow Blvd, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lynn Parsons, MS, RN, Director, Home Care; Eldonna Sylvia, MN, RN, ARNP, FNP, Clinical Assistant Professor; Ali Ammouri, MN, RN, PHD Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In Western countries, demographic trends clearly indicate an increase in the aging population well into the next century. Due to declining health, many of these elders will benefit from residence in assisted living. Currently, there is limited research about elder experiences in everyday decision making in these settings. The purpose of this study was to explore the experience of everyday decision making of elders in assisted living using a case study approach. The conceptual orientation in the study focused on elders, assisted living, activities of daily living, and everyday decision making. Two research questions guided this qualitative, inductive investigation. What is the experience of a cognitively intact elder in making everyday decisions in assisted living? What is the context that shapes this decision making? Informants for the case study were purposefully selected. Data were collected using observation, formal and informal interviews with elders, care-givers, and family members, and care planning documents. As data collection occurred, qualitative content analysis was done simultaneously to analyze data and inform methodology. Several themes emerged as significant in elder satisfaction with everyday decision making: (a) external connections; (b) internal collaboration; and (c) comfort with self and environment. Strategies for strengthening these contextually relevant factors are discussed. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:49:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:49:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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