The Effect of Learned Resourcefulness on the Relationship between Cognitive Processes and Adaptive Functioning in Depressed Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159235
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Learned Resourcefulness on the Relationship between Cognitive Processes and Adaptive Functioning in Depressed Adults
Abstract:
The Effect of Learned Resourcefulness on the Relationship between Cognitive Processes and Adaptive Functioning in Depressed Adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Lai, Chien-Yu, MSN, RN
Contact Address:SON, 13855 Superior Rd.- Apt #804, Cleveland, OH, 44118, USA
Co-Authors:Jaclene A. Zauszniewski, PhD, RNC, Associate Dean and Associate Professor
Approximately 19 million American adults suffer from a various forms of depressive illness in given 1-year period. Research has shown that depressed persons have difficulty with performing daily tasks, meeting their own personal care needs, and maintaining social relationships. According to Beck’s cognitive theory of depression, such deficits in adaptive functioning in a depressed person are affected by disturbances in specific cognitive process that he identified as autonomy and sociotropy. While autonomy is reflected in one’s personal beliefs about self-worth and capabilities, sociotropy is exemplified in one’s social interest and relationships with others. Each of these cognitive processes may differentially affect the depressed people’s ability to function in daily activities. Rosenbaum’s theory of learned resourcefulness suggests that the relationship between cognitive processes and adaptive functioning is influenced by learned resourcefulness and research has shown that persons with higher resourcefulness tend to function more adaptively. The proposed secondary analysis of existing data from 189 depressed adults, including 63 inpatients, 63 outpatients never hospitalized, and 63 previously hospitalized outpatients, will examine differences among the three groups on cognitive processes (personal beliefs and social interest), learned resourcefulness, and adaptive functioning and test a predictive model of adaptive functioning derived from Beck’s and Rosenbaum’s theories. Differences among the groups on the major study variables will be examined using oneway ANOVA. Potential mediating and moderating effects of learned resourcefulness on the relationship between cognitive processes (personal beliefs and social interest) and adaptive functioning will be examined using hierarchical multiple regression. Both analyses will be repeated while controlling for the potential effects of covariates that include age, gender, marital status, educational level, and annual income. The results of this study will provide direction for designing nursing interventions for teaching the cognitive-behavioral skills constituting learned resourcefulness to depressed adults in clinical settings and in the community.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of Learned Resourcefulness on the Relationship between Cognitive Processes and Adaptive Functioning in Depressed Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159235-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effect of Learned Resourcefulness on the Relationship between Cognitive Processes and Adaptive Functioning in Depressed Adults</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lai, Chien-Yu, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 13855 Superior Rd.- Apt #804, Cleveland, OH, 44118, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jaclene A. Zauszniewski, PhD, RNC, Associate Dean and Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Approximately 19 million American adults suffer from a various forms of depressive illness in given 1-year period. Research has shown that depressed persons have difficulty with performing daily tasks, meeting their own personal care needs, and maintaining social relationships. According to Beck&rsquo;s cognitive theory of depression, such deficits in adaptive functioning in a depressed person are affected by disturbances in specific cognitive process that he identified as autonomy and sociotropy. While autonomy is reflected in one&rsquo;s personal beliefs about self-worth and capabilities, sociotropy is exemplified in one&rsquo;s social interest and relationships with others. Each of these cognitive processes may differentially affect the depressed people&rsquo;s ability to function in daily activities. Rosenbaum&rsquo;s theory of learned resourcefulness suggests that the relationship between cognitive processes and adaptive functioning is influenced by learned resourcefulness and research has shown that persons with higher resourcefulness tend to function more adaptively. The proposed secondary analysis of existing data from 189 depressed adults, including 63 inpatients, 63 outpatients never hospitalized, and 63 previously hospitalized outpatients, will examine differences among the three groups on cognitive processes (personal beliefs and social interest), learned resourcefulness, and adaptive functioning and test a predictive model of adaptive functioning derived from Beck&rsquo;s and Rosenbaum&rsquo;s theories. Differences among the groups on the major study variables will be examined using oneway ANOVA. Potential mediating and moderating effects of learned resourcefulness on the relationship between cognitive processes (personal beliefs and social interest) and adaptive functioning will be examined using hierarchical multiple regression. Both analyses will be repeated while controlling for the potential effects of covariates that include age, gender, marital status, educational level, and annual income. The results of this study will provide direction for designing nursing interventions for teaching the cognitive-behavioral skills constituting learned resourcefulness to depressed adults in clinical settings and in the community. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:49:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:49:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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