2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159239
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Homemade and Commercial Incubator Covers: Light Reducing Capability
Abstract:
Homemade and Commercial Incubator Covers: Light Reducing Capability
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Ludington-Hoe, Susan, CNM, PhD, FAAN
Title:Professor
Contact Address:Pediatric Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Co-Authors:Donna Dowling, RN, PhD, Associate Professor; Lynn Lotas, RN, PhD, Director of Undergraduate Studies; Deborah L. Torowicz, RN, MSN, CCRN, Doctoral Student
Ambient light levels in neonatal intensive care units are quite variable, and preterm infant exposure to high light levels has been associated with short-term physiologic and long-term development problems. Current recommendations are to reduce lighting in the NICU by using incubator covers. Many NICUs use home-made covers to cover incubators. No reports of the effectiveness of home-made or commercial covers in reducing the light level within the incubator could be found. The purpose was to determine and compare light reducing capabilities of homemade covers and a commercial cover by measuring light transmission during day and night lighting. Design: 10 crocheted, 8 quilted and 2 fleece homemade covers and 2 commercial covers, and 1 polyester and cotton receiving blanket were compared. Each cover was tested a) completely covering an oxygen hood and then removed, and b) when covering an incubator. Methods: Each cover was described, measured and weighed. Light-filtering value was measured by Extech dosimeter when the cover was placed over an oxyhood and incubator and then removed for ten repetitions, yielding change in light from uncovered-to-covered periods. Data Analysis. Repeated measures ANOVA calculated differences between types of covers during the day and night time conditions. Results: 9/10 of the home-made covers were too small to cover portholes and the top of the incubator. One large home-made cover and the receiving blanket actually covered the left side porthole (location of infant's head). The large home-made cover produced data distinctly different from other covers. The light reducing capability of the commercial covers was 91.2%; the large home-made cover’s was 72.1%, the other home-made covers’ and receiving blanket’s was 55.1%. A significant difference between the commercial and home-made covers was found (F=452.50, p < 0.00). Home-made covers do not protect the infant from excessive light as well as commercial covers.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHomemade and Commercial Incubator Covers: Light Reducing Capabilityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159239-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Homemade and Commercial Incubator Covers: Light Reducing Capability</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ludington-Hoe, Susan, CNM, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Pediatric Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Donna Dowling, RN, PhD, Associate Professor; Lynn Lotas, RN, PhD, Director of Undergraduate Studies; Deborah L. Torowicz, RN, MSN, CCRN, Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Ambient light levels in neonatal intensive care units are quite variable, and preterm infant exposure to high light levels has been associated with short-term physiologic and long-term development problems. Current recommendations are to reduce lighting in the NICU by using incubator covers. Many NICUs use home-made covers to cover incubators. No reports of the effectiveness of home-made or commercial covers in reducing the light level within the incubator could be found. The purpose was to determine and compare light reducing capabilities of homemade covers and a commercial cover by measuring light transmission during day and night lighting. Design: 10 crocheted, 8 quilted and 2 fleece homemade covers and 2 commercial covers, and 1 polyester and cotton receiving blanket were compared. Each cover was tested a) completely covering an oxygen hood and then removed, and b) when covering an incubator. Methods: Each cover was described, measured and weighed. Light-filtering value was measured by Extech dosimeter when the cover was placed over an oxyhood and incubator and then removed for ten repetitions, yielding change in light from uncovered-to-covered periods. Data Analysis. Repeated measures ANOVA calculated differences between types of covers during the day and night time conditions. Results: 9/10 of the home-made covers were too small to cover portholes and the top of the incubator. One large home-made cover and the receiving blanket actually covered the left side porthole (location of infant's head). The large home-made cover produced data distinctly different from other covers. The light reducing capability of the commercial covers was 91.2%; the large home-made cover&rsquo;s was 72.1%, the other home-made covers&rsquo; and receiving blanket&rsquo;s was 55.1%. A significant difference between the commercial and home-made covers was found (F=452.50, p &lt; 0.00). Home-made covers do not protect the infant from excessive light as well as commercial covers.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:50:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:50:02Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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