Issues with providing consumer-centered care for medically indigent adults with physical disabilities

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159241
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Issues with providing consumer-centered care for medically indigent adults with physical disabilities
Abstract:
Issues with providing consumer-centered care for medically indigent adults with physical disabilities
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Lutz, Barbara, PhD, RN, CRRN
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:CON, P.O. Box 100197, Gainesville, FL, 32610, USA
Research suggests that adults with physical disabilities (AWPDs) are at greater risk for health-related disparities and, that when they become ill, their health care is more costly. Studies also indicate that consumer-centered health care programs that incorporate consumer-defined preferences are more cost effective and improve outcomes for AWPDs. This grounded theory pilot study explored issues associated with providing community-based, consumer-centered, integrated health and long-term care for medically indigent AWPDs. Data were collected through participant observation at team meetings with RNs, NPs, and social workers on seven teams and in interviews with six program consumers. Team members were asked to describe issues associated with providing consumer-centered services for AWPDs. Consumers were interviewed about their experiences with the program. Data were analyzed using constant comparative dimensional analysis. Staff perceived that consumers with complex mental health and social problems, and those whose preferences were not consistent with professional standards of practice consumed more resources and had poorer health outcomes. Consumers were frustrated with services that were not consistent, predictable, and individualized to their self-defined needs. Because high resource use by some consumers was identified as problematic, data on 187 consumers enrolled in the program during 2000 were also analyzed using multivariate linear regression. The dependent variable was total dollars spent per enrollee per month. Independent variables were age, education, gender, race, number of diagnoses, team, staff contact time per month, and diagnosis of a mental illness, substance abuse disorder, or both. Increased costs were associated with contact time and number of diagnoses. Findings indicate that the issues of integrating consumer preferences into health and long-term care are complex. Further research is needed to explore the “costs" and other outcomes associated with this practice. Support of this project from NINR (T32 NR07102), the Rehabilitation Nursing Foundation, and Sigma Theta Tau International is gratefully acknowledged.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIssues with providing consumer-centered care for medically indigent adults with physical disabilitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159241-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Issues with providing consumer-centered care for medically indigent adults with physical disabilities </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lutz, Barbara, PhD, RN, CRRN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, P.O. Box 100197, Gainesville, FL, 32610, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Research suggests that adults with physical disabilities (AWPDs) are at greater risk for health-related disparities and, that when they become ill, their health care is more costly. Studies also indicate that consumer-centered health care programs that incorporate consumer-defined preferences are more cost effective and improve outcomes for AWPDs. This grounded theory pilot study explored issues associated with providing community-based, consumer-centered, integrated health and long-term care for medically indigent AWPDs. Data were collected through participant observation at team meetings with RNs, NPs, and social workers on seven teams and in interviews with six program consumers. Team members were asked to describe issues associated with providing consumer-centered services for AWPDs. Consumers were interviewed about their experiences with the program. Data were analyzed using constant comparative dimensional analysis. Staff perceived that consumers with complex mental health and social problems, and those whose preferences were not consistent with professional standards of practice consumed more resources and had poorer health outcomes. Consumers were frustrated with services that were not consistent, predictable, and individualized to their self-defined needs. Because high resource use by some consumers was identified as problematic, data on 187 consumers enrolled in the program during 2000 were also analyzed using multivariate linear regression. The dependent variable was total dollars spent per enrollee per month. Independent variables were age, education, gender, race, number of diagnoses, team, staff contact time per month, and diagnosis of a mental illness, substance abuse disorder, or both. Increased costs were associated with contact time and number of diagnoses. Findings indicate that the issues of integrating consumer preferences into health and long-term care are complex. Further research is needed to explore the &ldquo;costs&quot; and other outcomes associated with this practice. Support of this project from NINR (T32 NR07102), the Rehabilitation Nursing Foundation, and Sigma Theta Tau International is gratefully acknowledged.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:50:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:50:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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