2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159244
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Research Evidence in Maternal Child Nursing Journals
Abstract:
Research Evidence in Maternal Child Nursing Journals
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Maloni, Judith, PhD, RN, FAAN
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton SON, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Co-Authors:JoAnn Glick, MSN, RN; Deirdre Williams, BS, Research Assistant
Recent analysis of childbearing health care practices by the Cochrane data base indicates that many practices are not supported by research. It is critical therefore that nurses who provide care at the bedside be aware of the research base for their practice. The purpose of this review of the evidence was to determine the quantity and type of research disseminated in clinical nursing journals commonly read by nurses who provide care to pregnant, laboring, and postpartum women and their families. The framework for evaluation of the evidence was the Hirsh Institute model. The sample consisted of the two maternal-child nursing journals most commonly read by staff nurses. A total of 509 articles form January 1999 through August 2003 (44 months) were reviewed. Method Content analysis was used to quantify and categorize the types of research. Analysis included identification of relevant clinical journals, journal review for the number of research based manuscripts, and categorization of research content into themes. The results were that 100 (19.6%) of the total published articles were research. Of the 100 publications, 86 % were descriptive studies, 9 % were tests of interventions, 3% were case studies and 1% each were for survey or psychometric research. Of the descriptive studies, 48% were about antepartum care, 8% were about intrapartum care, 8 % were about both antepartum and postpartum care, 17% were about postpartum care, an additional 8% were about nurses themselves, and 11% described a variety of topics. In conclusion research contained with maternal-child nursing journals addresses issues that contribute primarily to the knowledge of antepartum care. Little research addresses intrapartum and family centered care, care of the high-risk pregnant woman, and those with multiple gestations. Calls for such studies to be conducted are needed to increase the evidence base to guide clinical practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleResearch Evidence in Maternal Child Nursing Journalsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159244-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Research Evidence in Maternal Child Nursing Journals</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Maloni, Judith, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton SON, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">JoAnn Glick, MSN, RN; Deirdre Williams, BS, Research Assistant</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Recent analysis of childbearing health care practices by the Cochrane data base indicates that many practices are not supported by research. It is critical therefore that nurses who provide care at the bedside be aware of the research base for their practice. The purpose of this review of the evidence was to determine the quantity and type of research disseminated in clinical nursing journals commonly read by nurses who provide care to pregnant, laboring, and postpartum women and their families. The framework for evaluation of the evidence was the Hirsh Institute model. The sample consisted of the two maternal-child nursing journals most commonly read by staff nurses. A total of 509 articles form January 1999 through August 2003 (44 months) were reviewed. Method Content analysis was used to quantify and categorize the types of research. Analysis included identification of relevant clinical journals, journal review for the number of research based manuscripts, and categorization of research content into themes. The results were that 100 (19.6%) of the total published articles were research. Of the 100 publications, 86 % were descriptive studies, 9 % were tests of interventions, 3% were case studies and 1% each were for survey or psychometric research. Of the descriptive studies, 48% were about antepartum care, 8% were about intrapartum care, 8 % were about both antepartum and postpartum care, 17% were about postpartum care, an additional 8% were about nurses themselves, and 11% described a variety of topics. In conclusion research contained with maternal-child nursing journals addresses issues that contribute primarily to the knowledge of antepartum care. Little research addresses intrapartum and family centered care, care of the high-risk pregnant woman, and those with multiple gestations. Calls for such studies to be conducted are needed to increase the evidence base to guide clinical practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:50:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:50:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.