The Impact of Selected Environmental and Personal Factors on Professional Nursing Practice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159245
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact of Selected Environmental and Personal Factors on Professional Nursing Practice
Abstract:
The Impact of Selected Environmental and Personal Factors on Professional Nursing Practice
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Manojlovich, Milisa, PhD, RN
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing - Room 4305, 400 N. Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA
The purpose of the study was to understand how the hospital environment affects nursing practice behaviors. Many nurses perform isolated, routine tasks, and may not use their professional training because they are subject to control by organizational and medical divisions of labor. Nursing practice, carried out mainly through task-centered behaviors, may adversely affect patient outcomes. The environment may interfere with nurses’ ability to practice autonomously, and according to professional standards. Therefore, nursing may not be an attractive career option because of the task-centered focus of a lot of nursing work. Theoretical Framework: A new theory was developed that suggests the interaction between environmental factors, known as structural empowerment, and self-efficacy, may determine whether a nurse’s practice behavior is either professional or more task-focused. The effect of the environment on practice, one’s interpretation of that effect, and belief in the ability to do something about it, may affect one’s resolve to practice according to professional standards. Empowerment may allow nurses to reclaim control over practice behaviors, and practice more in accordance with professional standards. Subjects/Method: The study used a non-experimental, comparative design. 500 nurses throughout Michigan were randomly sampled, and 364 nurses responded, resulting in 266 usable surveys. Path analysis was used to demonstrate both direct and indirect effects of relevant variables. Results: Environmental factors (structural empowerment) and self-efficacy contributed to differences in professional nursing practice. Self-efficacy was a stronger predictor of professional behaviors than was empowerment. Self-efficacy mainly exerted its effect as a mediator in the relationship between the environmental factors and practice behaviors. Conclusions: Nurses may be able to practice more professionally when the environment provides opportunities and power through resources, support, and information. Self-efficacy may be an important contributor to practice behaviors, especially in an environment that already has the requisite factors that provide empowerment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact of Selected Environmental and Personal Factors on Professional Nursing Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159245-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Impact of Selected Environmental and Personal Factors on Professional Nursing Practice </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Manojlovich, Milisa, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing - Room 4305, 400 N. Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of the study was to understand how the hospital environment affects nursing practice behaviors. Many nurses perform isolated, routine tasks, and may not use their professional training because they are subject to control by organizational and medical divisions of labor. Nursing practice, carried out mainly through task-centered behaviors, may adversely affect patient outcomes. The environment may interfere with nurses&rsquo; ability to practice autonomously, and according to professional standards. Therefore, nursing may not be an attractive career option because of the task-centered focus of a lot of nursing work. Theoretical Framework: A new theory was developed that suggests the interaction between environmental factors, known as structural empowerment, and self-efficacy, may determine whether a nurse&rsquo;s practice behavior is either professional or more task-focused. The effect of the environment on practice, one&rsquo;s interpretation of that effect, and belief in the ability to do something about it, may affect one&rsquo;s resolve to practice according to professional standards. Empowerment may allow nurses to reclaim control over practice behaviors, and practice more in accordance with professional standards. Subjects/Method: The study used a non-experimental, comparative design. 500 nurses throughout Michigan were randomly sampled, and 364 nurses responded, resulting in 266 usable surveys. Path analysis was used to demonstrate both direct and indirect effects of relevant variables. Results: Environmental factors (structural empowerment) and self-efficacy contributed to differences in professional nursing practice. Self-efficacy was a stronger predictor of professional behaviors than was empowerment. Self-efficacy mainly exerted its effect as a mediator in the relationship between the environmental factors and practice behaviors. Conclusions: Nurses may be able to practice more professionally when the environment provides opportunities and power through resources, support, and information. Self-efficacy may be an important contributor to practice behaviors, especially in an environment that already has the requisite factors that provide empowerment.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:50:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:50:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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