Adolescent Pregnancy Avoidance Among Low-Income African American and Hispanic Girls

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159248
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adolescent Pregnancy Avoidance Among Low-Income African American and Hispanic Girls
Abstract:
Adolescent Pregnancy Avoidance Among Low-Income African American and Hispanic Girls
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Martyn, Kristy , PhD, APRN, BC, CPNP
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:SON, 400 N. Ingalls - Room 3160, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA
Adolescent birth rates in the United States have declined dramatically since the 1990’s, however almost 900,000 adolescents continue to become pregnant each year. The greatest declines have occurred among African American girls and the least declines among Hispanic girls. A better understanding of “what works” for adolescents who successfully avoid pregnancy may help us to understand what might work for adolescents who continue to become pregnant and have babies. The purpose of this research was to extend a grounded theory of rewriting negative scripts developed with young African American women who avoided adolescent pregnancy to explain the social psychological processes of low-income African American and Hispanic adolescent girls who avoid pregnancy. Cultural and social scripting theories provide a framework for understanding the connection between social expectations and norms and individual personal experiences of the study participants. Data collection included event history calendars and in-depth interviews with 15 to 19 year old low-income African American (n=15) and Hispanic (n=10) girls. Data analysis using the constant comparative method revealed that the girls’ cultural and social psychological scripting presented a conflict between negative societal and cultural messages and positive individual and family messages. All of the girls avoided pregnancy by rewriting negative social psychological scripts by being aware of their scripts, determined not to be a pregnant adolescent “statistic,” delaying childbearing and obtaining an education. Motivation to rewrite negative scripts was influenced by a strong sense of self for the African American girls and by a strong commitment to family honor and respect for the Hispanic girls. Future research, practice implications, and considerations for programmatic interventions can be based on this analysis.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdolescent Pregnancy Avoidance Among Low-Income African American and Hispanic Girlsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159248-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adolescent Pregnancy Avoidance Among Low-Income African American and Hispanic Girls </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Martyn, Kristy , PhD, APRN, BC, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 400 N. Ingalls - Room 3160, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Adolescent birth rates in the United States have declined dramatically since the 1990&rsquo;s, however almost 900,000 adolescents continue to become pregnant each year. The greatest declines have occurred among African American girls and the least declines among Hispanic girls. A better understanding of &ldquo;what works&rdquo; for adolescents who successfully avoid pregnancy may help us to understand what might work for adolescents who continue to become pregnant and have babies. The purpose of this research was to extend a grounded theory of rewriting negative scripts developed with young African American women who avoided adolescent pregnancy to explain the social psychological processes of low-income African American and Hispanic adolescent girls who avoid pregnancy. Cultural and social scripting theories provide a framework for understanding the connection between social expectations and norms and individual personal experiences of the study participants. Data collection included event history calendars and in-depth interviews with 15 to 19 year old low-income African American (n=15) and Hispanic (n=10) girls. Data analysis using the constant comparative method revealed that the girls&rsquo; cultural and social psychological scripting presented a conflict between negative societal and cultural messages and positive individual and family messages. All of the girls avoided pregnancy by rewriting negative social psychological scripts by being aware of their scripts, determined not to be a pregnant adolescent &ldquo;statistic,&rdquo; delaying childbearing and obtaining an education. Motivation to rewrite negative scripts was influenced by a strong sense of self for the African American girls and by a strong commitment to family honor and respect for the Hispanic girls. Future research, practice implications, and considerations for programmatic interventions can be based on this analysis. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:50:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:50:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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