2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159249
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Breastfeeding Education in University Nursing Programs
Abstract:
Breastfeeding Education in University Nursing Programs
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Marzalik, Penny, CNM, IBCLC
Contact Address:CON - Maternal /Child, 3927 Linden Avenue, Western Springs, IL, 60558, USA
need to address the topic of breastfeeding education in university nursing programs is supported by the past goals, future goals, and current statistics regarding breastfeeding rates in the United States (United States Department of Health and Human Services, 2000). Currently, less than half of the babies born in the United States are given the opportunity to breastfeed exclusively (Ryan, Wenjan, and Acosta, 2002). The problem of the disparity between scientific knowledge that “breast is best” and the appropriate professional nursing support for promotion, initiation, and continuation of breastfeeding is significant for the optimal health and well being of infants and mothers. Although factors such as uninformed opinions from family and friends, restrictive work situations, and successful formula marketing campaigns may negatively influence a mother’s decision to breastfeed, lack of scientifically based, consistent information and support from nursing professionals should not contribute to the low rates of breastfeeding initiation and continuation in the United States. For the largest group of health care professionals to make an impact on breastfeeding initiation and continuation rates, nursing students need to acquire correct breastfeeding knowledge and effective breastfeeding skills. Previous research on breastfeeding education is limited in number of studies and geographic sampling but does indicate that breastfeeding education in nursing programs is less than adequate. The purpose of this research is to examine on a national scale how baccalaureate-nursing students are being educated in breastfeeding and the knowledge and attitudes of senior students. A tool evaluating senior nursing students’ knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy, and social supports regarding breastfeeding will provide the data needed to identify the most effective method for preparing tomorrow’s largest group of health care professionals with the foundation to actively promote and support breastfeeding. Findings, results, and conclusions will be presented in poster format.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBreastfeeding Education in University Nursing Programsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159249-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Breastfeeding Education in University Nursing Programs</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Marzalik, Penny, CNM, IBCLC </td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON - Maternal /Child, 3927 Linden Avenue, Western Springs, IL, 60558, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">need to address the topic of breastfeeding education in university nursing programs is supported by the past goals, future goals, and current statistics regarding breastfeeding rates in the United States (United States Department of Health and Human Services, 2000). Currently, less than half of the babies born in the United States are given the opportunity to breastfeed exclusively (Ryan, Wenjan, and Acosta, 2002). The problem of the disparity between scientific knowledge that &ldquo;breast is best&rdquo; and the appropriate professional nursing support for promotion, initiation, and continuation of breastfeeding is significant for the optimal health and well being of infants and mothers. Although factors such as uninformed opinions from family and friends, restrictive work situations, and successful formula marketing campaigns may negatively influence a mother&rsquo;s decision to breastfeed, lack of scientifically based, consistent information and support from nursing professionals should not contribute to the low rates of breastfeeding initiation and continuation in the United States. For the largest group of health care professionals to make an impact on breastfeeding initiation and continuation rates, nursing students need to acquire correct breastfeeding knowledge and effective breastfeeding skills. Previous research on breastfeeding education is limited in number of studies and geographic sampling but does indicate that breastfeeding education in nursing programs is less than adequate. The purpose of this research is to examine on a national scale how baccalaureate-nursing students are being educated in breastfeeding and the knowledge and attitudes of senior students. A tool evaluating senior nursing students&rsquo; knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy, and social supports regarding breastfeeding will provide the data needed to identify the most effective method for preparing tomorrow&rsquo;s largest group of health care professionals with the foundation to actively promote and support breastfeeding. Findings, results, and conclusions will be presented in poster format. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:50:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:50:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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