Multiple Traumas, Shame, Guilt, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms Among Battered Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159250
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Multiple Traumas, Shame, Guilt, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms Among Battered Women
Abstract:
Multiple Traumas, Shame, Guilt, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms Among Battered Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:McLaughlin, Dorcas, PhD, APRN, BC, CP
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:SON, 3525 Caroline Mall, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA
The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among multiple types of traumatic events, severity of battering, shame, and guilt and overall severity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Joseph, Williams, and Yule’s (1997) integrative model of psychosocial factors relating to adaptation to traumatic stress and Lewis’ (1971) theories on shame and guilt provided the theoretical framework for this study. The hypothesis was that multiple traumatic events, severity of battering, shame, and guilt contribute significantly to overall severity of PTSD symptoms and PTSD diagnosis. One hundred women were recruited from agencies for battered women. Each participant, in a face-to-face structured interview, completed the following inventories: Partner Abuse Scale-Physical, Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale, Test of Self-Conscious Affect and a demographic questionnaire. Seventy-six percent of the women met criteria for PTSD diagnosis. Ninety-two percent of the women reported two or more types of multiple traumatic events in addition to intimate partner battering. Significant positive correlations were found among multiple types of traumatic events, severity of battering, and severity of PTSD symptoms. The expected associations between shame and guilt with severity of PTSD symptoms were not supported. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis revealed that multiple types of traumatic events and severity of battering predicted 31% of the variance in overall severity of PTSD symptoms. Hierarchical logistic regression analysis indicated that severity of battering over and above multiple types of traumatic events contributed to PTSD diagnosis. The findings of this study suggest that battered women are at high risk for posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms. These findings highlight the need for assessment of PTSD symptoms among battered women and the development of interventions that alleviate or facilitate coping with these distressing symptoms.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMultiple Traumas, Shame, Guilt, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms Among Battered Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159250-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Multiple Traumas, Shame, Guilt, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms Among Battered Women </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McLaughlin, Dorcas, PhD, APRN, BC, CP</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 3525 Caroline Mall, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among multiple types of traumatic events, severity of battering, shame, and guilt and overall severity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Joseph, Williams, and Yule&rsquo;s (1997) integrative model of psychosocial factors relating to adaptation to traumatic stress and Lewis&rsquo; (1971) theories on shame and guilt provided the theoretical framework for this study. The hypothesis was that multiple traumatic events, severity of battering, shame, and guilt contribute significantly to overall severity of PTSD symptoms and PTSD diagnosis. One hundred women were recruited from agencies for battered women. Each participant, in a face-to-face structured interview, completed the following inventories: Partner Abuse Scale-Physical, Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale, Test of Self-Conscious Affect and a demographic questionnaire. Seventy-six percent of the women met criteria for PTSD diagnosis. Ninety-two percent of the women reported two or more types of multiple traumatic events in addition to intimate partner battering. Significant positive correlations were found among multiple types of traumatic events, severity of battering, and severity of PTSD symptoms. The expected associations between shame and guilt with severity of PTSD symptoms were not supported. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis revealed that multiple types of traumatic events and severity of battering predicted 31% of the variance in overall severity of PTSD symptoms. Hierarchical logistic regression analysis indicated that severity of battering over and above multiple types of traumatic events contributed to PTSD diagnosis. The findings of this study suggest that battered women are at high risk for posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms. These findings highlight the need for assessment of PTSD symptoms among battered women and the development of interventions that alleviate or facilitate coping with these distressing symptoms.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:50:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:50:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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