2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159253
Type:
Presentation
Title:
IEP Review of Medication Inclusion Study
Abstract:
IEP Review of Medication Inclusion Study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Narsavage, Georgia, PhD, RN, CS, ANP
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton SON, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Co-Authors:Mary Ostendorf, MSN, RN, School Nurse; Hsiu-Ju Chang, PhD student, RN
The purpose of this study was to ascertain which medications are administered to grade-school students and then examine Individual Education Plan’s (IEPs) to identify whether IEPs include medications. If medication information is missing from the IEP, students are at risk for poor management of symptoms, and exacerbation of illness. CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK: Neuman’s Systems Model was used to guide the study. The client for care was grade-school children. The system was the school district with pertinent subsystems of administration, school nurses, teachers, and psychologists. The stressor was the need for medications/IEP. Secondary and tertiary prevention were the nursing focus. DESIGN: A retrospective descriptive comparative study of existing school records. Data were collected from selected records of children enrolled in the first, third, fifth and seventh grades during the 2002-2003 school year in an urban school district, following IRB approval. METHOD: A school nurse abstracted data from existing records. Information from IEPs was compared to individual nurse medication records of administration and consent forms (5161) indicating medications administered according to the law. No names were linked to data abstraction forms. RESULTS: Predominant medication administration was for asthma and ADHD. All recorded administered medications had a 5161 form on file. 19.5% of IEPs included medications. 6.5% of IEPs had nurses involved in the initial preparation meeting. CONCLUSION: School nurses are not consistently included in planning a student’s IEP. Even when they are involved, medications may not be included on the IEP. Currently IEPs that do include medications can be a catalyst for care to focus attention on the child’s needs that then will be shared with principals, teachers and other school nurses – ely important in districts with high student movement among schools. The long term goal is to develop a method to intervene to include medications on all pertinent IEPs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIEP Review of Medication Inclusion Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159253-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">IEP Review of Medication Inclusion Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Narsavage, Georgia, PhD, RN, CS, ANP</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton SON, 10900 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary Ostendorf, MSN, RN, School Nurse; Hsiu-Ju Chang, PhD student, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to ascertain which medications are administered to grade-school students and then examine Individual Education Plan&rsquo;s (IEPs) to identify whether IEPs include medications. If medication information is missing from the IEP, students are at risk for poor management of symptoms, and exacerbation of illness. CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK: Neuman&rsquo;s Systems Model was used to guide the study. The client for care was grade-school children. The system was the school district with pertinent subsystems of administration, school nurses, teachers, and psychologists. The stressor was the need for medications/IEP. Secondary and tertiary prevention were the nursing focus. DESIGN: A retrospective descriptive comparative study of existing school records. Data were collected from selected records of children enrolled in the first, third, fifth and seventh grades during the 2002-2003 school year in an urban school district, following IRB approval. METHOD: A school nurse abstracted data from existing records. Information from IEPs was compared to individual nurse medication records of administration and consent forms (5161) indicating medications administered according to the law. No names were linked to data abstraction forms. RESULTS: Predominant medication administration was for asthma and ADHD. All recorded administered medications had a 5161 form on file. 19.5% of IEPs included medications. 6.5% of IEPs had nurses involved in the initial preparation meeting. CONCLUSION: School nurses are not consistently included in planning a student&rsquo;s IEP. Even when they are involved, medications may not be included on the IEP. Currently IEPs that do include medications can be a catalyst for care to focus attention on the child&rsquo;s needs that then will be shared with principals, teachers and other school nurses &ndash; ely important in districts with high student movement among schools. The long term goal is to develop a method to intervene to include medications on all pertinent IEPs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:50:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:50:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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