How do women spend their time? Interviews of lifelong and current physical activity.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159260
Type:
Presentation
Title:
How do women spend their time? Interviews of lifelong and current physical activity.
Abstract:
How do women spend their time? Interviews of lifelong and current physical activity.
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Plonczynski, Donna, APN, PhD
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:SON, 1240 Normal Rd , DeKalb, IL, 60115, USA
Higher prevalence rates of cardiovascular disease and inactivity have been identified with older rural women when compared with men or urban women. Little is known, however, about the factors that influence physical activity in this population to reduce this health disparity. The purpose of this study was to identify the lifelong and current physical activity behaviors of older women who reside in low-income rural communities in the Midwest. A modification of the Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior guided this study. Cross-sectional survey methodology was used with a convenience sample of 176 women between the ages of 65-85 years. The research was conducted by face-to-face interviews in the women’s homes or a place of their choosing. Lifelong and 12-month, 3-dimensional (household, leisure, occupational) measures of physical activity were used. Analyses included descriptive statistics, correlations, and Student-t statistics. The participants were predominantly low-income women with an average age of 74 years. Half of the women lived within the largest two cities, while the other half lived on farms and within small towns. The mean BMI was 28.2 and the mean BP readings were 138.4 systolic and 74.5 diastolic. The participants were generally inactive during leisure or occupation time during their lives. Sixty-seven percent of a woman’s current activity was from the household dimension. Married women and those living in the more rural communities engaged in significantly higher levels of household physical activity in the previous year. Women who resided in the two largest cities engaged in significantly higher levels of leisure activities than the more rural women. The inclusion of the household dimension allowed for the comprehensive measurement of physical activity with older women. Nurses can use the study information to assist women to develop strategies to stay active and link physical activity performance with health benefits such as hypertension control and weight management.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHow do women spend their time? Interviews of lifelong and current physical activity.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159260-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">How do women spend their time? Interviews of lifelong and current physical activity. </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Plonczynski, Donna, APN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 1240 Normal Rd , DeKalb, IL, 60115, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Higher prevalence rates of cardiovascular disease and inactivity have been identified with older rural women when compared with men or urban women. Little is known, however, about the factors that influence physical activity in this population to reduce this health disparity. The purpose of this study was to identify the lifelong and current physical activity behaviors of older women who reside in low-income rural communities in the Midwest. A modification of the Interaction Model of Client Health Behavior guided this study. Cross-sectional survey methodology was used with a convenience sample of 176 women between the ages of 65-85 years. The research was conducted by face-to-face interviews in the women&rsquo;s homes or a place of their choosing. Lifelong and 12-month, 3-dimensional (household, leisure, occupational) measures of physical activity were used. Analyses included descriptive statistics, correlations, and Student-t statistics. The participants were predominantly low-income women with an average age of 74 years. Half of the women lived within the largest two cities, while the other half lived on farms and within small towns. The mean BMI was 28.2 and the mean BP readings were 138.4 systolic and 74.5 diastolic. The participants were generally inactive during leisure or occupation time during their lives. Sixty-seven percent of a woman&rsquo;s current activity was from the household dimension. Married women and those living in the more rural communities engaged in significantly higher levels of household physical activity in the previous year. Women who resided in the two largest cities engaged in significantly higher levels of leisure activities than the more rural women. The inclusion of the household dimension allowed for the comprehensive measurement of physical activity with older women. Nurses can use the study information to assist women to develop strategies to stay active and link physical activity performance with health benefits such as hypertension control and weight management.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:51:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:51:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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