2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159261
Type:
Presentation
Title:
When Venus Interviews Mars: Towards a Better Understanding of Fathering
Abstract:
When Venus Interviews Mars: Towards a Better Understanding of Fathering
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Pohlman, Shawn, PhD, RN
Contact Address:843 Heron Woods Dr., Manchester, MO, 63021, USA
paper is based on my experiences as a nurse researcher interviewing fathers of pre-term infants as part of an interpretive phenomenological study. The purpose of this paper is to examine the aspects that shaped both my dialogue with fathers during the interviews and my subsequent understanding of their narratives. I discovered that gender issues, participant observation, the inadvertent inclusion of mothers in the interviews, and non-verbal communication all had a part to play in the interview process and deepened my understanding of fathering. Gender has been likened to a “force field”—exerting a type of gravitational pull on our being which is always present and yet is often invisible. Indeed, gender issues surfaced in many of the interviews in two ways: the trials and tribulations of interviewing men and the dynamics of interviewing someone of the opposite gender. Because fathers are sometimes less verbal by nature, participant observation became a valuable tool, often increasing my understanding of their narratives. Although the notion of including mothers in the interviews certainly wasn’t planned, their presence greatly enhanced my understanding of the father’s world and offered significant insight. Careful attention to non-verbal communication played a key role in some interviews; in particular mood, emotion, and often what was “not said” were important factors during interviews and data analysis. The insight I have gained from interviewing fathers has some important implications for research and practice. Through careful listening and watching, there is much we can learn from fathers if we take the time and keep an open mind and heart during the process.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhen Venus Interviews Mars: Towards a Better Understanding of Fatheringen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159261-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">When Venus Interviews Mars: Towards a Better Understanding of Fathering</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pohlman, Shawn, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">843 Heron Woods Dr., Manchester, MO, 63021, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">paper is based on my experiences as a nurse researcher interviewing fathers of pre-term infants as part of an interpretive phenomenological study. The purpose of this paper is to examine the aspects that shaped both my dialogue with fathers during the interviews and my subsequent understanding of their narratives. I discovered that gender issues, participant observation, the inadvertent inclusion of mothers in the interviews, and non-verbal communication all had a part to play in the interview process and deepened my understanding of fathering. Gender has been likened to a &ldquo;force field&rdquo;&mdash;exerting a type of gravitational pull on our being which is always present and yet is often invisible. Indeed, gender issues surfaced in many of the interviews in two ways: the trials and tribulations of interviewing men and the dynamics of interviewing someone of the opposite gender. Because fathers are sometimes less verbal by nature, participant observation became a valuable tool, often increasing my understanding of their narratives. Although the notion of including mothers in the interviews certainly wasn&rsquo;t planned, their presence greatly enhanced my understanding of the father&rsquo;s world and offered significant insight. Careful attention to non-verbal communication played a key role in some interviews; in particular mood, emotion, and often what was &ldquo;not said&rdquo; were important factors during interviews and data analysis. The insight I have gained from interviewing fathers has some important implications for research and practice. Through careful listening and watching, there is much we can learn from fathers if we take the time and keep an open mind and heart during the process.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:51:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:51:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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