2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159262
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Spiritual Well-being, Self-esteem, and Solitude in Holistic Weight Management
Abstract:
Spiritual Well-being, Self-esteem, and Solitude in Holistic Weight Management
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Popkess-Vawter, Sue, PhD, RN
Title:Professor of Nursing
Contact Address:SON, 3901 Rainbow Blvd.- #3045, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA
Co-Authors:Elizabeth Yoder, BSN, RN, Graduate Student; Gretchen Quenstedt-Moe, MS, RN, Doctoral Student; Leonie Pallikkathayil, DNS, RN
Overweight statistics have soared to epidemic proportions. 64 percent of adult Americans are overweight despite a decade of national initiatives to abate the growing problem. The need for this study arose from the investigator's clinical observations of possible relationships among patients' weight management failures, negative beliefs about self, and spiritual hunger. There is a lack of literature regarding the role of spiritual well-being, self-esteem, and solitude in wellness care and, in particular, weight management. The purpose of this descriptive, exploratory study was to investigate relationships among weight management progress and measures of spiritual well-being, self-esteem, and solitude. The sample consisted of adult subjects who had received lifestyle counseling from a weight management clinical nurse specialist; 34 of the total caseload of 104 patients (33% response rate) responded to a mail survey. Measures included an investigator-developed questionnaire about their weight management and lifestyle progress and spirituality well-being and self-esteem questionnaires. Exploratory data analyses included linear regression analyses and t-tests. Significant linear relationships were found; total spiritual well-being explained approximately 47% of the variance of self-esteem, and existential spiritual well-being accounted for approximately 68% of the variance of self-esteem. Interestingly, the self rating of time spent in solitude was significantly greater for subjects who had maintained 10 pounds of weight loss compared to those who maintained a <10 pound weight loss over six months (t [22]=3.06, p=.006). It was concluded that spiritual well-being was significantly related to self-esteem and further study is needed to explain relationships among spiritual well-being, self-esteem, and solitude in weight management. Key words: weight management, spiritual well-being, self-esteem
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSpiritual Well-being, Self-esteem, and Solitude in Holistic Weight Managementen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159262-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Spiritual Well-being, Self-esteem, and Solitude in Holistic Weight Management </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Popkess-Vawter, Sue, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 3901 Rainbow Blvd.- #3045, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Elizabeth Yoder, BSN, RN, Graduate Student; Gretchen Quenstedt-Moe, MS, RN, Doctoral Student; Leonie Pallikkathayil, DNS, RN </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Overweight statistics have soared to epidemic proportions. 64 percent of adult Americans are overweight despite a decade of national initiatives to abate the growing problem. The need for this study arose from the investigator's clinical observations of possible relationships among patients' weight management failures, negative beliefs about self, and spiritual hunger. There is a lack of literature regarding the role of spiritual well-being, self-esteem, and solitude in wellness care and, in particular, weight management. The purpose of this descriptive, exploratory study was to investigate relationships among weight management progress and measures of spiritual well-being, self-esteem, and solitude. The sample consisted of adult subjects who had received lifestyle counseling from a weight management clinical nurse specialist; 34 of the total caseload of 104 patients (33% response rate) responded to a mail survey. Measures included an investigator-developed questionnaire about their weight management and lifestyle progress and spirituality well-being and self-esteem questionnaires. Exploratory data analyses included linear regression analyses and t-tests. Significant linear relationships were found; total spiritual well-being explained approximately 47% of the variance of self-esteem, and existential spiritual well-being accounted for approximately 68% of the variance of self-esteem. Interestingly, the self rating of time spent in solitude was significantly greater for subjects who had maintained 10 pounds of weight loss compared to those who maintained a &lt;10 pound weight loss over six months (t [22]=3.06, p=.006). It was concluded that spiritual well-being was significantly related to self-esteem and further study is needed to explain relationships among spiritual well-being, self-esteem, and solitude in weight management. Key words: weight management, spiritual well-being, self-esteem </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:51:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:51:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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