Participant evaluations of an anonymous audio-computer interview for domestic violence assessment and advocacy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159265
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Participant evaluations of an anonymous audio-computer interview for domestic violence assessment and advocacy
Abstract:
Participant evaluations of an anonymous audio-computer interview for domestic violence assessment and advocacy
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Renker, Paula, PhD, RNC
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:CON, 201-X Mary Gladwin Hall, Akron,, OH, 44224, USA
The objective of this presentation is to discuss postpartum women’s perceptions of the use of an anonymous audio computer interview for assessing domestic violence and for conveying advocacy information. Conceptual Framework: The framework developed for this research postulates that abused women’s acknowledgement of violence when asked by health care providers is affected by their perception of the severity and meaning of violence, the frequency of violence and barriers to reporting arising from specific personal, health care, and legal concerns. Participants Five hundred newly delivered postpartum women over the age of 17 were recruited to participate in this study. Participants ranged in age from 18-24 and were racially and economically diverse. Methods: The computer interviews were developed by the PI and included violence screening and assessment, questions related to the participants’ experiences with violence assessment by health care providers and their acknowledgement of abuse, and advocacy information. Videos of professional violence advocates discussing safety issues were included for both women experiencing violence and for those who might have abused friends and family members. Ten questions were adapted from Lapham, Kring, & Skipper’s (1991) evaluation of a computer program for screening high risk prenatal behaviors for participants to assess their comfort and ability to communicate their experiences in the research interview. Results: Both descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze responses for the sample as a whole as well as comparing and contrasting the opinions of women from different age, economic, racial, and ethnic groups. Conclusions: Participants perspectives of anonymous computer interviews for violence assessment may encourage health care providers to increase violence screening, assessment, and provision of advocacy. Identification of abused women is necessary for the provision of essential safety information so that women and their children can remain physically safe and spiritually free.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleParticipant evaluations of an anonymous audio-computer interview for domestic violence assessment and advocacyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159265-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Participant evaluations of an anonymous audio-computer interview for domestic violence assessment and advocacy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Renker, Paula, PhD, RNC</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 201-X Mary Gladwin Hall, Akron,, OH, 44224, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The objective of this presentation is to discuss postpartum women&rsquo;s perceptions of the use of an anonymous audio computer interview for assessing domestic violence and for conveying advocacy information. Conceptual Framework: The framework developed for this research postulates that abused women&rsquo;s acknowledgement of violence when asked by health care providers is affected by their perception of the severity and meaning of violence, the frequency of violence and barriers to reporting arising from specific personal, health care, and legal concerns. Participants Five hundred newly delivered postpartum women over the age of 17 were recruited to participate in this study. Participants ranged in age from 18-24 and were racially and economically diverse. Methods: The computer interviews were developed by the PI and included violence screening and assessment, questions related to the participants&rsquo; experiences with violence assessment by health care providers and their acknowledgement of abuse, and advocacy information. Videos of professional violence advocates discussing safety issues were included for both women experiencing violence and for those who might have abused friends and family members. Ten questions were adapted from Lapham, Kring, &amp; Skipper&rsquo;s (1991) evaluation of a computer program for screening high risk prenatal behaviors for participants to assess their comfort and ability to communicate their experiences in the research interview. Results: Both descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze responses for the sample as a whole as well as comparing and contrasting the opinions of women from different age, economic, racial, and ethnic groups. Conclusions: Participants perspectives of anonymous computer interviews for violence assessment may encourage health care providers to increase violence screening, assessment, and provision of advocacy. Identification of abused women is necessary for the provision of essential safety information so that women and their children can remain physically safe and spiritually free.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:51:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:51:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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