A Nursing Intervention To Limit Hyperbilirubinemia in Newborn Infants of Breastfeeding Primipara Mothers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159267
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Nursing Intervention To Limit Hyperbilirubinemia in Newborn Infants of Breastfeeding Primipara Mothers
Abstract:
A Nursing Intervention To Limit Hyperbilirubinemia in Newborn Infants of Breastfeeding Primipara Mothers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Rustia, Janice, PhD, RN
Contact Address:PAES 985330, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA
The purposes of this pilot study were to test and refine a modified protocol of care (Bilirubin Program) for breastfeeding primipara mothers to determine its’ applicability in reducing the incidence of hyperbilirubinemia and increasing breastfeeding success. A between groups design was used to compare specific outcomes for both mother and infant using sequential convenience sampling. Fifty-six primipara mothers were recruited from breastfeeding classes at a midwestern metropolitan hospital. Control group mothers received standard postpartum care. Treatment group mothers were given additional education regarding jaundice and breastfeeding. Mothers participated in the collection and recording of data. Subjects received a home visit and telephone followup calls at one and two weeks, and two months postdischarge. Frequency distributions (e.g., mean, mode and standard deviations) were computed for age, number of breast feedings, mother’s fluid intake, supplementation, infant hydration and postdischarge health care encounters. Crosstabs compared the times each group initiated breastfeeding following delivery. Independent t-tests analyzed jaundice assessment scores, number of breast feedings/24 hours and elimination patterns. Results of data analysis indicated few differences in the numbers of mothers who continued breastfeeding or in the majority of variables assessed. An overwhelming positive response in both groups to the home visit challenges the current practice of limiting home visits to high risk mothers and infants. A full scale study is recommended with modifications in sampling procedures and data collection, including randomized sampling and concurrent data collection from treatment and control groups by researchers who are project personnel.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Nursing Intervention To Limit Hyperbilirubinemia in Newborn Infants of Breastfeeding Primipara Mothersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159267-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Nursing Intervention To Limit Hyperbilirubinemia in Newborn Infants of Breastfeeding Primipara Mothers </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rustia, Janice, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PAES 985330, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purposes of this pilot study were to test and refine a modified protocol of care (Bilirubin Program) for breastfeeding primipara mothers to determine its&rsquo; applicability in reducing the incidence of hyperbilirubinemia and increasing breastfeeding success. A between groups design was used to compare specific outcomes for both mother and infant using sequential convenience sampling. Fifty-six primipara mothers were recruited from breastfeeding classes at a midwestern metropolitan hospital. Control group mothers received standard postpartum care. Treatment group mothers were given additional education regarding jaundice and breastfeeding. Mothers participated in the collection and recording of data. Subjects received a home visit and telephone followup calls at one and two weeks, and two months postdischarge. Frequency distributions (e.g., mean, mode and standard deviations) were computed for age, number of breast feedings, mother&rsquo;s fluid intake, supplementation, infant hydration and postdischarge health care encounters. Crosstabs compared the times each group initiated breastfeeding following delivery. Independent t-tests analyzed jaundice assessment scores, number of breast feedings/24 hours and elimination patterns. Results of data analysis indicated few differences in the numbers of mothers who continued breastfeeding or in the majority of variables assessed. An overwhelming positive response in both groups to the home visit challenges the current practice of limiting home visits to high risk mothers and infants. A full scale study is recommended with modifications in sampling procedures and data collection, including randomized sampling and concurrent data collection from treatment and control groups by researchers who are project personnel.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:51:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:51:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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