2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159271
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Beliefs and Osteoporosis Preventing Behaviors in Women
Abstract:
Health Beliefs and Osteoporosis Preventing Behaviors in Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Sedlak, Carol, PhD, RN, ONC
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:CON, Henderson Hall, Kent, OH, 44242, USA
Co-Authors:Margaret Doheny, PhD, RN, ONC, Professor; Patricia Estok, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor Emeritus; Richard Zeller, PhD, Visiting Professor
Osteoporosis is a debilitating loss of bone mass resulting in high financial and social costs. The purpose of this longitudinal experimental study was to determine if having a bone mineral density screening via dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was related to health beliefs, and osteoporosis preventing behaviors (OPB) in women between the ages of 50 to 65 years at 12 months post DXA. The Revised Health Belief Model (RHBM) provided the theoretical framework. Research questions were: 1) Does having a DXA screen cause an increase in knowledge of osteoporosis? 2) Does having a DXA screen cause a change in Health Belief scores? 3) Does having a DXA screen cause an increase in OPB? A total of 202 women were randomly assigned into two groups. The experimental group (n=100) received a DXA scan at the beginning of the study and the control group (n=102) did not. All completed a questionnaire initially, at 6 and 12 months comprised of the Osteoporosis Knowledge Test (OKT), Osteoporosis Health Belief Scale (OHBS), and OPB Survey (OPBS) (Doheny & Sedlak, 1995). There was no statistically significant difference in knowledge of osteoporosis between the treatment and control groups. A repeated measures ANOVA revealed that the treatment group had higher perceived susceptibility than the control group (Mean Treatment=18.10; Mean Control=16.52; F=4.824; df=1, 200; p=.029), there were no significant differences in the other HBM variables. Those women in the experimental group increased their calcium intake significantly more than the control group (F=3.149; df=4, 186; p=.018). They also increased their use of osteoporosis preventing medications (c2=3.902, df=1; p=.048). Further data indicated women who had abnormal DXA results were more likely to increase their calcium intake. Findings indicated DXA's increased women's perceived susceptibility to osteoporosis, calcium intake, and use of osteoporosis preventing medication and appears to be an effective intervention in promoting OPB in younger postmenopausal women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Beliefs and Osteoporosis Preventing Behaviors in Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159271-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Beliefs and Osteoporosis Preventing Behaviors in Women </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sedlak, Carol, PhD, RN, ONC</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, Henderson Hall, Kent, OH, 44242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Margaret Doheny, PhD, RN, ONC, Professor; Patricia Estok, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor Emeritus; Richard Zeller, PhD, Visiting Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Osteoporosis is a debilitating loss of bone mass resulting in high financial and social costs. The purpose of this longitudinal experimental study was to determine if having a bone mineral density screening via dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was related to health beliefs, and osteoporosis preventing behaviors (OPB) in women between the ages of 50 to 65 years at 12 months post DXA. The Revised Health Belief Model (RHBM) provided the theoretical framework. Research questions were: 1) Does having a DXA screen cause an increase in knowledge of osteoporosis? 2) Does having a DXA screen cause a change in Health Belief scores? 3) Does having a DXA screen cause an increase in OPB? A total of 202 women were randomly assigned into two groups. The experimental group (n=100) received a DXA scan at the beginning of the study and the control group (n=102) did not. All completed a questionnaire initially, at 6 and 12 months comprised of the Osteoporosis Knowledge Test (OKT), Osteoporosis Health Belief Scale (OHBS), and OPB Survey (OPBS) (Doheny &amp; Sedlak, 1995). There was no statistically significant difference in knowledge of osteoporosis between the treatment and control groups. A repeated measures ANOVA revealed that the treatment group had higher perceived susceptibility than the control group (Mean Treatment=18.10; Mean Control=16.52; F=4.824; df=1, 200; p=.029), there were no significant differences in the other HBM variables. Those women in the experimental group increased their calcium intake significantly more than the control group (F=3.149; df=4, 186; p=.018). They also increased their use of osteoporosis preventing medications (c2=3.902, df=1; p=.048). Further data indicated women who had abnormal DXA results were more likely to increase their calcium intake. Findings indicated DXA's increased women's perceived susceptibility to osteoporosis, calcium intake, and use of osteoporosis preventing medication and appears to be an effective intervention in promoting OPB in younger postmenopausal women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:51:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:51:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.