2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159273
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Beginning the Dialogue: Determining Preferences for Care Near the End of Life
Abstract:
Beginning the Dialogue: Determining Preferences for Care Near the End of Life
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Sheehan, Denice, MSN, RN
Contact Address:10358 Hanford Lane, Twinsburg,, OH, 44087, USA
Co-Authors:Victoria M. Schirm, PhD, RN, CS, Professor of Nursing
Health care providers need to help patients assess preferences for end of life care and make decisions prior to extreme illness or overwhelming crisis. This study further evaluated the construct validity of a previously developed instrument designed to assess patient preferences for end of life care. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: The instrument, entitled “Preferences for Care Near the End of Life (PCEOL),” was developed by Gauthier and Froman (2001). The theoretical underpinnings of the PCEOL instrument specify several dimensions of care including decision-making, family, spirituality, and affective communication. Subjects: During the current study, the PCEOL instrument was administered to a convenience sample of health care providers (N=68) recruited from a workshop regarding end of life care. Method: The instrument constitutes a 32-item, five-point Likert-type scale. A principal components factor analysis yielded a scree plot and eigenvalues indicating a 3-factor structure. This structure was then rotated to a varimax solution. Items not clearly defining a factor in this structure (at >.5) and items with multiple loadings (difference <.2) were eliminated from further analysis. Results: Factor I was defined by items focused on Personal Autonomy related to decision-making about one’s death. Factor II focused on Health Care Providers’ Input into decision-making. Factor III related to Spirituality considerations and Family participation in decision-making. Cronbach alphas for each of the factors ranged from .83 to .87. Conclusions: Nurses are the consistent health care providers to individuals and their families, and it is often nurses who facilitate informed decision-making. The PCEOL instrument may be a helpful instrument in defining care dimensions near the end of life, and it may also assist in beginning the dialogue about preferences for care with individuals and their families.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBeginning the Dialogue: Determining Preferences for Care Near the End of Lifeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159273-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Beginning the Dialogue: Determining Preferences for Care Near the End of Life</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sheehan, Denice, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">10358 Hanford Lane, Twinsburg,, OH, 44087, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Victoria M. Schirm, PhD, RN, CS, Professor of Nursing</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Health care providers need to help patients assess preferences for end of life care and make decisions prior to extreme illness or overwhelming crisis. This study further evaluated the construct validity of a previously developed instrument designed to assess patient preferences for end of life care. Theoretical/Conceptual Framework: The instrument, entitled &ldquo;Preferences for Care Near the End of Life (PCEOL),&rdquo; was developed by Gauthier and Froman (2001). The theoretical underpinnings of the PCEOL instrument specify several dimensions of care including decision-making, family, spirituality, and affective communication. Subjects: During the current study, the PCEOL instrument was administered to a convenience sample of health care providers (N=68) recruited from a workshop regarding end of life care. Method: The instrument constitutes a 32-item, five-point Likert-type scale. A principal components factor analysis yielded a scree plot and eigenvalues indicating a 3-factor structure. This structure was then rotated to a varimax solution. Items not clearly defining a factor in this structure (at &gt;.5) and items with multiple loadings (difference &lt;.2) were eliminated from further analysis. Results: Factor I was defined by items focused on Personal Autonomy related to decision-making about one&rsquo;s death. Factor II focused on Health Care Providers&rsquo; Input into decision-making. Factor III related to Spirituality considerations and Family participation in decision-making. Cronbach alphas for each of the factors ranged from .83 to .87. Conclusions: Nurses are the consistent health care providers to individuals and their families, and it is often nurses who facilitate informed decision-making. The PCEOL instrument may be a helpful instrument in defining care dimensions near the end of life, and it may also assist in beginning the dialogue about preferences for care with individuals and their families. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:51:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:51:51Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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