2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159274
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The role of recency of care demands on caregiver burden and depression
Abstract:
The role of recency of care demands on caregiver burden and depression
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Sherwood, Paula, RN, CNRN
Contact Address:CON, 4101 Brunswick Avenue, Flint, MI, 48507, USA
Co-Authors:Barbara A. Given, PhD, RN, FAAN, University Distinguished Professor; Charles W. Given, PhD, Professor; Alexander von Eye, PhD, Professor
The effect of care recipients’ functional and mental status on caregiver outcomes is well documented. However, the effect of recency of care demands (how recent care demands are introduced to the care situation) is largely unexplained. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of recency of care demands on caregiver burden and depression. Theoretical framework: The study was based on an adaptation hypothesis (Schulz et al., 1995), that caregiver outcomes are worse when new care demands are introduced (or are more recent), and outcomes improve over time as caregivers employ adaptive behaviors. Subjects: The study recruited an inception cohort of 488 family caregivers of persons discharged from acute care with various chronic diagnoses. Care recipients had at least one new need for assistance post-discharge. Methods: A descriptive study used structural equation modeling with baseline and six-week interview data to identify the effects of recency of care demands on caregiver burden and depression, given differing levels of care recipients’ functional and mental status. Results: Patients’ functional and mental status predicted caregiver burden. Recency of care demands was also a significant independent predictor of caregiver burden – more recent care demands increased burden. Caregiver burden, in turn, predicted caregiver depression. None of the other variables directly predicted caregiver depression. Conclusions: The results supported an adaptation hypothesis, suggesting that recency of care demands plays a role in caregiver outcomes. Practitioners should implement caregiver interventions when care demands are introduced (i.e. with changes in care recipients’ health status), as caregivers are particularly vulnerable to developing burden when demands are more recent. In research, recency of care demands should be included as a potential independent or confounding variable in caregiver outcome studies. Acknowledgements: NIA/NIH (AG06584); NINR/NIH (F31 NR08069); American Cancer Society, Michigan State University College of Nursing, Mary Margaret Walther Cancer Institute
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe role of recency of care demands on caregiver burden and depressionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159274-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The role of recency of care demands on caregiver burden and depression</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sherwood, Paula, RN, CNRN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, 4101 Brunswick Avenue, Flint, MI, 48507, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Barbara A. Given, PhD, RN, FAAN, University Distinguished Professor; Charles W. Given, PhD, Professor; Alexander von Eye, PhD, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The effect of care recipients&rsquo; functional and mental status on caregiver outcomes is well documented. However, the effect of recency of care demands (how recent care demands are introduced to the care situation) is largely unexplained. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of recency of care demands on caregiver burden and depression. Theoretical framework: The study was based on an adaptation hypothesis (Schulz et al., 1995), that caregiver outcomes are worse when new care demands are introduced (or are more recent), and outcomes improve over time as caregivers employ adaptive behaviors. Subjects: The study recruited an inception cohort of 488 family caregivers of persons discharged from acute care with various chronic diagnoses. Care recipients had at least one new need for assistance post-discharge. Methods: A descriptive study used structural equation modeling with baseline and six-week interview data to identify the effects of recency of care demands on caregiver burden and depression, given differing levels of care recipients&rsquo; functional and mental status. Results: Patients&rsquo; functional and mental status predicted caregiver burden. Recency of care demands was also a significant independent predictor of caregiver burden &ndash; more recent care demands increased burden. Caregiver burden, in turn, predicted caregiver depression. None of the other variables directly predicted caregiver depression. Conclusions: The results supported an adaptation hypothesis, suggesting that recency of care demands plays a role in caregiver outcomes. Practitioners should implement caregiver interventions when care demands are introduced (i.e. with changes in care recipients&rsquo; health status), as caregivers are particularly vulnerable to developing burden when demands are more recent. In research, recency of care demands should be included as a potential independent or confounding variable in caregiver outcome studies. Acknowledgements: NIA/NIH (AG06584); NINR/NIH (F31 NR08069); American Cancer Society, Michigan State University College of Nursing, Mary Margaret Walther Cancer Institute </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:51:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:51:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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