2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159276
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Witnessing violence: Biopsychosocial impact on children
Abstract:
Witnessing violence: Biopsychosocial impact on children
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Skybo, Theresa, PhD, RN, CPNP
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:1585 Neil Ave, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA
School-age children are exposed to violence such as gang activities, gunshots, and physical assault. More children witness violence than are the victims or perpetrators; however little research focuses on their appraisal of this violence. Witnessing violence can lead to an acute or chronic stress response. Theoretical framework/Purpose: Based on developmental theory and Lazarus’ stress-coping theory, the purpose of this study is to examine children’s appraisal of violence they have witnessed and their biopsychosocial responses. The specific aims of this study were: 1. To characterize children’s exposure to violence and their physical, psychological & behavioral responses. 2. To analyze the relationships among types and frequency of exposure, appraisal of violence, and biopsychosocial responses. 3. To evaluate the contribution of children’s exposure to violence to the biopsychosocial symptoms that they report. 4. To analyze differences between gender and race/ethnicity in their exposure to violence and their biopsychosocial symptoms. Methods/Design: A correlational, descriptive design was used with a convenience sample of 62 children, ages 7-13, from an inner-city school district. Data were collected via 7 open-ended questions (appraisal of violence exposure), a human figure drawing (psychological response), and two self-report instruments (exposure to and impact of violence, stress related symptoms). Results: Most (95%) of these children witnessed violent acts. Appraisals of these events were consistent with Lazarus’ appraisal categories of harm/loss and threat. Total number of witnessed violent encounters correlate with stress symptoms (r=.272*) and frequency of symptoms (r=.336 *). There is no significant difference between gender and race and exposure to violence or their biopsychosocial symptoms. Conclusions: This is the first study to examine children’s perceptions of violence and their stress responses. These and future findings can be used for nursing interventions to minimize children’s exposure and improve coping behaviors to decrease the toll of violence.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWitnessing violence: Biopsychosocial impact on childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159276-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Witnessing violence: Biopsychosocial impact on children </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Skybo, Theresa, PhD, RN, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1585 Neil Ave, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">School-age children are exposed to violence such as gang activities, gunshots, and physical assault. More children witness violence than are the victims or perpetrators; however little research focuses on their appraisal of this violence. Witnessing violence can lead to an acute or chronic stress response. Theoretical framework/Purpose: Based on developmental theory and Lazarus&rsquo; stress-coping theory, the purpose of this study is to examine children&rsquo;s appraisal of violence they have witnessed and their biopsychosocial responses. The specific aims of this study were: 1. To characterize children&rsquo;s exposure to violence and their physical, psychological &amp; behavioral responses. 2. To analyze the relationships among types and frequency of exposure, appraisal of violence, and biopsychosocial responses. 3. To evaluate the contribution of children&rsquo;s exposure to violence to the biopsychosocial symptoms that they report. 4. To analyze differences between gender and race/ethnicity in their exposure to violence and their biopsychosocial symptoms. Methods/Design: A correlational, descriptive design was used with a convenience sample of 62 children, ages 7-13, from an inner-city school district. Data were collected via 7 open-ended questions (appraisal of violence exposure), a human figure drawing (psychological response), and two self-report instruments (exposure to and impact of violence, stress related symptoms). Results: Most (95%) of these children witnessed violent acts. Appraisals of these events were consistent with Lazarus&rsquo; appraisal categories of harm/loss and threat. Total number of witnessed violent encounters correlate with stress symptoms (r=.272*) and frequency of symptoms (r=.336 *). There is no significant difference between gender and race and exposure to violence or their biopsychosocial symptoms. Conclusions: This is the first study to examine children&rsquo;s perceptions of violence and their stress responses. These and future findings can be used for nursing interventions to minimize children&rsquo;s exposure and improve coping behaviors to decrease the toll of violence.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:52:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:52:01Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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