2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159277
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship Between Fear of Falling and Walking Intensity in Older Adults
Abstract:
Relationship Between Fear of Falling and Walking Intensity in Older Adults
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Snow, Meghan
Title:Research Assistant
Contact Address:SON, 3525 Caroline Mall, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA
Co-Authors:Joanne Kraenzle Schneider, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; Deborah Rilling Bronder, BS, Research Coordinator; Catherine A. Smith, Rebecca A. Lorenz, MHA, RN, Doctoral Student, James H. Cook, LPC, MA, NCC, Group Educator
Health care practitioners need to understand fear of falling (FOF) in older adults to design effective interventions. Within a self-regulation framework, older adults with greater FOF will engage in less intense walking than those with lower FOF. Reduced walking intensity may result in reduced everyday physical functioning thereby reducing quality of life. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between fear of falling and walking intensity in older adults. Community-dwelling women and men (n=30; mean age=73.4, SD=4.6; 80% women) participated in an interview about exercise behavior and fear of falling. Fear of falling was measured with a 0 indicating no concern at all, to 10 indicating very concerned. Participants reporting FOF (1-10) were grouped into three walking intensities: light, moderate, and vigorous walkers. Results showed a significant difference between groups [F(2,27)=4.39, p=.022]. As expected, light walkers reported the highest FOF (6.8) followed by moderate walkers (4.4), and vigorous walkers (3.5). Bonferroni post hoc analysis showed that only light walkers reported significantly higher FOF than vigorous (p=.019) walkers. Older adults reporting higher FOF reported lower walking intensities than those with lower FOF. Future research should investigate a causal relationship between walking intensity and FOF. Health care professional should provide education and safety monitoring that addresses the fears of older adults. With less FOF, older adults will feel comfortable walking at moderate and vigorous intensities to maintain or improve their functional levels, therefore enhancing their quality of life.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship Between Fear of Falling and Walking Intensity in Older Adultsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159277-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationship Between Fear of Falling and Walking Intensity in Older Adults </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Snow, Meghan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Assistant</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, 3525 Caroline Mall, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Joanne Kraenzle Schneider, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; Deborah Rilling Bronder, BS, Research Coordinator; Catherine A. Smith, Rebecca A. Lorenz, MHA, RN, Doctoral Student, James H. Cook, LPC, MA, NCC, Group Educator</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Health care practitioners need to understand fear of falling (FOF) in older adults to design effective interventions. Within a self-regulation framework, older adults with greater FOF will engage in less intense walking than those with lower FOF. Reduced walking intensity may result in reduced everyday physical functioning thereby reducing quality of life. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between fear of falling and walking intensity in older adults. Community-dwelling women and men (n=30; mean age=73.4, SD=4.6; 80% women) participated in an interview about exercise behavior and fear of falling. Fear of falling was measured with a 0 indicating no concern at all, to 10 indicating very concerned. Participants reporting FOF (1-10) were grouped into three walking intensities: light, moderate, and vigorous walkers. Results showed a significant difference between groups [F(2,27)=4.39, p=.022]. As expected, light walkers reported the highest FOF (6.8) followed by moderate walkers (4.4), and vigorous walkers (3.5). Bonferroni post hoc analysis showed that only light walkers reported significantly higher FOF than vigorous (p=.019) walkers. Older adults reporting higher FOF reported lower walking intensities than those with lower FOF. Future research should investigate a causal relationship between walking intensity and FOF. Health care professional should provide education and safety monitoring that addresses the fears of older adults. With less FOF, older adults will feel comfortable walking at moderate and vigorous intensities to maintain or improve their functional levels, therefore enhancing their quality of life.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:52:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:52:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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