Prevalence of Disaffirming & Traumatizing Provider Interactions & Depression among Obstetric Patients

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159279
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Prevalence of Disaffirming & Traumatizing Provider Interactions & Depression among Obstetric Patients
Abstract:
Prevalence of Disaffirming & Traumatizing Provider Interactions & Depression among Obstetric Patients
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Sorenson, Dianna, PhD, RN, CNS
Title:Professor
Contact Address:Graduate Nursing, Box 2275, Brookings, SD, 57007, USA
Co-Authors:Lois Tschetter, EdD, RN, IBCLC, Associate Professor
The purpose of this investigation was to explore the quality of provider interactions and prevalence of traumatizing provider interactions and depression among post-partum women in a north central state. Despite suggestive evidence from Europe, American scientists have disregarded disaffirming health-care provider interactions as important antecedents to psychological birth-trauma symptoms, psychological vulnerability and subsequent length and severity of immediate postpartum and long-term depression. Disaffirming interactions include verbal/nonverbal behaviors perceived as denying or contradicting one’s personhood. Extremely disaffirming or repetitive exposure can lead to psychological perinatal trauma (characteristics include: severe taxation of coping resources, expression of intense negative feelings, prolonged conscious awareness of contributory threats to well-being, and painful memories/ repetitive thought patterns). Peplau’s theory of interpersonal relations guided this investigation. Research questions were: What is the pattern of provider interaction quality as perceived among postpartum women? What is the prevalence of traumatizing provider interactions among postpartum women? What is the relationship between postpartum depression and the quality of provider interactions and perinatal trauma. The sample included 100 women delivering after 12/30/02. The first 100 women whose births were newspaper published and had corresponding telephone listings were contacted to identify interest in participating. Each received: 1) questionnaires; 2) demographic profile; 3) Human Subjects Implied Consent; 4) and a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Questionnaires included: Quality of Provider Interactions (QPI), Overall Birth Perceptions Rating, Post-Traumatic Childbirth Stress (PCS) instrument, and the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI). The quality of provider interactions was determined via exploratory data analyses of QPI. The prevalence of traumatizing provider interactions was determined from PCS scores, calculating an odds ratio and simple percentages prevalence rates for the sample using Department of Health statistics on percentages of county reported births. Correlations were calculated to determine the relationships between BDI, QPI, and PCS. Results indicate the need for prevention and early interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrevalence of Disaffirming & Traumatizing Provider Interactions & Depression among Obstetric Patientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159279-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Prevalence of Disaffirming &amp; Traumatizing Provider Interactions &amp; Depression among Obstetric Patients </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sorenson, Dianna, PhD, RN, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Graduate Nursing, Box 2275, Brookings, SD, 57007, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lois Tschetter, EdD, RN, IBCLC, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this investigation was to explore the quality of provider interactions and prevalence of traumatizing provider interactions and depression among post-partum women in a north central state. Despite suggestive evidence from Europe, American scientists have disregarded disaffirming health-care provider interactions as important antecedents to psychological birth-trauma symptoms, psychological vulnerability and subsequent length and severity of immediate postpartum and long-term depression. Disaffirming interactions include verbal/nonverbal behaviors perceived as denying or contradicting one&rsquo;s personhood. Extremely disaffirming or repetitive exposure can lead to psychological perinatal trauma (characteristics include: severe taxation of coping resources, expression of intense negative feelings, prolonged conscious awareness of contributory threats to well-being, and painful memories/ repetitive thought patterns). Peplau&rsquo;s theory of interpersonal relations guided this investigation. Research questions were: What is the pattern of provider interaction quality as perceived among postpartum women? What is the prevalence of traumatizing provider interactions among postpartum women? What is the relationship between postpartum depression and the quality of provider interactions and perinatal trauma. The sample included 100 women delivering after 12/30/02. The first 100 women whose births were newspaper published and had corresponding telephone listings were contacted to identify interest in participating. Each received: 1) questionnaires; 2) demographic profile; 3) Human Subjects Implied Consent; 4) and a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Questionnaires included: Quality of Provider Interactions (QPI), Overall Birth Perceptions Rating, Post-Traumatic Childbirth Stress (PCS) instrument, and the Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI). The quality of provider interactions was determined via exploratory data analyses of QPI. The prevalence of traumatizing provider interactions was determined from PCS scores, calculating an odds ratio and simple percentages prevalence rates for the sample using Department of Health statistics on percentages of county reported births. Correlations were calculated to determine the relationships between BDI, QPI, and PCS. Results indicate the need for prevention and early interventions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:52:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:52:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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