2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159282
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Learning from Girls: Family Scripts and Sexual Health
Abstract:
Learning from Girls: Family Scripts and Sexual Health
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Teitelman, Anne, PhD, APRN-BC
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:CON, A203 Life Sciences Building, East Lansing, MI, 48824-1317 , USA
Little is known about the context of social relationships in which girls construct their sexualities. The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe female adolescents’ interpretations of family interactions about sexuality in order to better understand how families influence the developing sexuality of girls. An ecological framework was used to explore human sexual development within the context of the family. In-depth individual interviews were conducted with 33 adolescent girls ages 14-18. The sample consisted of both African-American and European-American girls from higher and lower income families. Transcriptions of these recorded conversations were analyzed using an interpretive methodological approach. Findings from the narrative analysis indicate that many families were unable to achieve a balance between respecting teenage girls’ need to make independent decisions about sexuality and relationships on the one hand and the girls’ need for parental support and guidance on the other. In the other social spheres, outside of the family, (friends/peers, partners, school, media) information was often limited, guidance was minimal, and pressures to adhere to narrow standards of behavior and appearance were strong. For all participants, in both higher and lower-income families, there was little discussion about how girls might be sexual in ways that allow them to feel in charge of their decisions. For lower income participants, family scripts were generally more accepting of girls’ sexuality. However, this accepting attitude was often accompanied by greater scrutiny and control over girls’ behavior. For higher-income teens, family scripts emphasized that girls’ were in charge of their decisions generally. However, these families were less likely to treat sexuality as an active part of girls’ lives. Further research is needed to better understand how neighborhood and community factors effect family interactions concerning girls’ developing sexuality.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLearning from Girls: Family Scripts and Sexual Healthen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159282-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Learning from Girls: Family Scripts and Sexual Health</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Teitelman, Anne, PhD, APRN-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor </td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, A203 Life Sciences Building, East Lansing, MI, 48824-1317 , USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Little is known about the context of social relationships in which girls construct their sexualities. The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe female adolescents&rsquo; interpretations of family interactions about sexuality in order to better understand how families influence the developing sexuality of girls. An ecological framework was used to explore human sexual development within the context of the family. In-depth individual interviews were conducted with 33 adolescent girls ages 14-18. The sample consisted of both African-American and European-American girls from higher and lower income families. Transcriptions of these recorded conversations were analyzed using an interpretive methodological approach. Findings from the narrative analysis indicate that many families were unable to achieve a balance between respecting teenage girls&rsquo; need to make independent decisions about sexuality and relationships on the one hand and the girls&rsquo; need for parental support and guidance on the other. In the other social spheres, outside of the family, (friends/peers, partners, school, media) information was often limited, guidance was minimal, and pressures to adhere to narrow standards of behavior and appearance were strong. For all participants, in both higher and lower-income families, there was little discussion about how girls might be sexual in ways that allow them to feel in charge of their decisions. For lower income participants, family scripts were generally more accepting of girls&rsquo; sexuality. However, this accepting attitude was often accompanied by greater scrutiny and control over girls&rsquo; behavior. For higher-income teens, family scripts emphasized that girls&rsquo; were in charge of their decisions generally. However, these families were less likely to treat sexuality as an active part of girls&rsquo; lives. Further research is needed to better understand how neighborhood and community factors effect family interactions concerning girls&rsquo; developing sexuality.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:52:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:52:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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