2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159285
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assessing Suicide Ideation: Comparing Self-Report Versus Clinician
Abstract:
Assessing Suicide Ideation: Comparing Self-Report Versus Clinician
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Tucker, Sharon, DNSc, RN, CNS
Title:Clinical Nurse Researcher
Contact Address:Nursing, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA
Co-Authors:Hirut Yigletu, RN, MS, Psychiatric Staff Nurse; Marcelline Harris, RN, PhD, Clinical Nurse Researcher; Jacqueline Hatlevig, PhD, RNC, Professor
US statistics indicate that suicide takes the lives of approximately 30,000 people each year. Risk factors vary with age, gender and ethnic group; often occur in combination; and change over time. Consequently, accurate identification of suicidal ideation presents challenges. Both self-report tools and clinician interview are used in practice (the latter more common) however there is limited research that systematically compares agreement of suicidal ideation between these methods, nor agreement in relation to reported risk factors. The purpose of this study was to determine whether, at time of admission to an inpatient unit, participants disclosed the same suicide-related information on a self-administered questionnaire (Beck Depression Inventory) that clinicians reported following a face-to-face structured interview with the participants. A secondary analysis was completed using an existing research database of 68 inpatients treated for mood or anxiety disorders. Data were coded as negative or positive for suicide ideations with all ambivalent or partially positive responses coded as positive. Both descriptive and Kappa statistics were used to compare assessment methods. In 80% of cases, responses were in agreement between the two assessment methods. Disagreement between assessment methods was found for 13 (19.4%) cases. Kappa statistic indicated the rate of disagreement was beyond chance (p=0.00). Analyses of subsets of the data based on age, gender and education indicated that agreement between assessment methods increased as age and education levels of study participants increased. The results of this study have implications for practice, and point to needs for additional research. In practice, both methods for assessing suicide ideation at time of admission to an inpatient unit are indicated. Additional research is planned to compare methods of assessing suicide ideation that involve a larger, more heterogeneous sample, a prospective design, and examination of data based on demographic and other risk variables.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssessing Suicide Ideation: Comparing Self-Report Versus Clinicianen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159285-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Assessing Suicide Ideation: Comparing Self-Report Versus Clinician </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tucker, Sharon, DNSc, RN, CNS</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Nurse Researcher</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nursing, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Hirut Yigletu, RN, MS, Psychiatric Staff Nurse; Marcelline Harris, RN, PhD, Clinical Nurse Researcher; Jacqueline Hatlevig, PhD, RNC, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">US statistics indicate that suicide takes the lives of approximately 30,000 people each year. Risk factors vary with age, gender and ethnic group; often occur in combination; and change over time. Consequently, accurate identification of suicidal ideation presents challenges. Both self-report tools and clinician interview are used in practice (the latter more common) however there is limited research that systematically compares agreement of suicidal ideation between these methods, nor agreement in relation to reported risk factors. The purpose of this study was to determine whether, at time of admission to an inpatient unit, participants disclosed the same suicide-related information on a self-administered questionnaire (Beck Depression Inventory) that clinicians reported following a face-to-face structured interview with the participants. A secondary analysis was completed using an existing research database of 68 inpatients treated for mood or anxiety disorders. Data were coded as negative or positive for suicide ideations with all ambivalent or partially positive responses coded as positive. Both descriptive and Kappa statistics were used to compare assessment methods. In 80% of cases, responses were in agreement between the two assessment methods. Disagreement between assessment methods was found for 13 (19.4%) cases. Kappa statistic indicated the rate of disagreement was beyond chance (p=0.00). Analyses of subsets of the data based on age, gender and education indicated that agreement between assessment methods increased as age and education levels of study participants increased. The results of this study have implications for practice, and point to needs for additional research. In practice, both methods for assessing suicide ideation at time of admission to an inpatient unit are indicated. Additional research is planned to compare methods of assessing suicide ideation that involve a larger, more heterogeneous sample, a prospective design, and examination of data based on demographic and other risk variables. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:52:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:52:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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