Correlates of Weaning Outcomes in Mechanically Ventilated Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159286
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Correlates of Weaning Outcomes in Mechanically Ventilated Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Abstract:
Correlates of Weaning Outcomes in Mechanically Ventilated Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Twibell, K., DNS, RN
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:SON, Cooper Science Building, Muncie, IN, 47306, USA
Co-Authors:Debra Siela, DNSc, RN, CCRN, CCNS, APRN, BC, RRT, Assistant Professor; Mahnaz Mahmoodi, RN, MSN, Assistant Professor
Timely weaning from mechanical ventilation reduces human distress and health care costs. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are at risk for delayed weaning. Research has not clearly defined factors related to complete weaning in COPD patients. The purpose of this prospective study was to examine relationships among physiological and perceptual variables and weaning outcomes in patients with COPD (n=36). The study was a secondary analysis of data drawn from a larger data set of mechanically ventilated patients. The Weaning Continuum Model (Knebel et al, 1994) provided the framework. Data were collected using the Burns Weaning Assessment Program (Burns et al, 1994) and visual analog scales to measure perceptions of dyspnea, fatigue, and weaning self-efficacy. The sample was composed primarily of elderly, Caucasian females undergoing an initial weaning attempt from short-term mechanical ventilation. Participants reported moderate fatigue, moderate dyspnea, and high weaning-self-efficacy. Findings included significant correlations among perceptual variables (p=.05 - .001) and between fatigue and hematocrit, abdominal distention, and adequacy of swallow/cough reflexes (p=.05). One-fourth of the sample was incompletely weaned. Arterial pH, paO2, paCO2, and absence of abdominal distention were significantly related to complete weaning (p=.002 - .037). No significant relationships were found between perceptions and weaning outcomes. No variables significantly predicted weaning outcomes, possibly due to sample size. COPD patients were more hemodynamically stable, more stressed, and less well-rested than a subsample without COPD (n=30) taken from the same data set (p=.04 - .007). Commonly measured pulmonary mechanics were not significantly related to any study variables. Results suggested that traditional blood gas variables were the strongest correlates of weaning outcomes in COPD patients. Nursing strategies to alleviate stress, promote sleep, reduce fatigue, and ease dyspnea are particularly necessary in patients with COPD who are weaning from mechanical ventilation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCorrelates of Weaning Outcomes in Mechanically Ventilated Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseaseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159286-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Correlates of Weaning Outcomes in Mechanically Ventilated Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Twibell, K., DNS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, Cooper Science Building, Muncie, IN, 47306, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Debra Siela, DNSc, RN, CCRN, CCNS, APRN, BC, RRT, Assistant Professor; Mahnaz Mahmoodi, RN, MSN, Assistant Professor </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Timely weaning from mechanical ventilation reduces human distress and health care costs. Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are at risk for delayed weaning. Research has not clearly defined factors related to complete weaning in COPD patients. The purpose of this prospective study was to examine relationships among physiological and perceptual variables and weaning outcomes in patients with COPD (n=36). The study was a secondary analysis of data drawn from a larger data set of mechanically ventilated patients. The Weaning Continuum Model (Knebel et al, 1994) provided the framework. Data were collected using the Burns Weaning Assessment Program (Burns et al, 1994) and visual analog scales to measure perceptions of dyspnea, fatigue, and weaning self-efficacy. The sample was composed primarily of elderly, Caucasian females undergoing an initial weaning attempt from short-term mechanical ventilation. Participants reported moderate fatigue, moderate dyspnea, and high weaning-self-efficacy. Findings included significant correlations among perceptual variables (p=.05 - .001) and between fatigue and hematocrit, abdominal distention, and adequacy of swallow/cough reflexes (p=.05). One-fourth of the sample was incompletely weaned. Arterial pH, paO2, paCO2, and absence of abdominal distention were significantly related to complete weaning (p=.002 - .037). No significant relationships were found between perceptions and weaning outcomes. No variables significantly predicted weaning outcomes, possibly due to sample size. COPD patients were more hemodynamically stable, more stressed, and less well-rested than a subsample without COPD (n=30) taken from the same data set (p=.04 - .007). Commonly measured pulmonary mechanics were not significantly related to any study variables. Results suggested that traditional blood gas variables were the strongest correlates of weaning outcomes in COPD patients. Nursing strategies to alleviate stress, promote sleep, reduce fatigue, and ease dyspnea are particularly necessary in patients with COPD who are weaning from mechanical ventilation. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:52:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:52:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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