2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159287
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Meta-Analysis of the Effect Size of Guided Imagery
Abstract:
A Meta-Analysis of the Effect Size of Guided Imagery
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Van Kuiken, Debra, BSN
Contact Address:SON, P.O. Box 210038, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0038, USA
Guided imagery is a holistic intervention, but little is known about the effects of length of practice on outcomes. This meta-analysis examined the research literature published from 1997-2002 to determine the relationship of duration of practice with effect size of outcomes. Theoretical Framework: This analysis used the psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) model to explain the communication network that links the cognitive, emotional, autonomic, endocrine, and immune functions through the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. Subjects: An initial computerized search of CINAHL, Medline, and PubMed for Guided Imagery yielded 75 adult-only studies written in English. After excluding studies with multiple interventions, such as journaling, 16 publications were examined. One study reported 241 subjects, while the others reported 13-86 subjects. Method: Ten studies had adequate statistical reporting to calculate the d-statistic, allowing a comparison of effect size (ES) among studies. If multiple dependent variables were measured in one time period, the mean ES was used. A simple plot of the d-statistic ES against duration of practice illustrated the relationship of practice duration with strength of outcomes. Results: Plotting revealed effect sizes increased in relationship with time over the first 12 weeks of practice (ranging from ES of 0.4 to 1.0), however in two 18-week studies, ES (0.4) decreased in strength. No correlations were performed due to the small sample size. Conclusions: This study suggests that with increasing practice in imagery, outcomes improve initially and then level off at 3-5 months. The small sample size and the paucity of details of the interventions and participants’ practice patterns prohibit generalizing to all guided imagery interventions. The variety of outcomes in these studies decreases the ability to generalize further. As additional primary studies become available, a more thorough evaluation of interaction of time and guided imagery will be possible.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Meta-Analysis of the Effect Size of Guided Imageryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159287-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Meta-Analysis of the Effect Size of Guided Imagery</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Van Kuiken, Debra, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON, P.O. Box 210038, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0038, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Guided imagery is a holistic intervention, but little is known about the effects of length of practice on outcomes. This meta-analysis examined the research literature published from 1997-2002 to determine the relationship of duration of practice with effect size of outcomes. Theoretical Framework: This analysis used the psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) model to explain the communication network that links the cognitive, emotional, autonomic, endocrine, and immune functions through the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. Subjects: An initial computerized search of CINAHL, Medline, and PubMed for Guided Imagery yielded 75 adult-only studies written in English. After excluding studies with multiple interventions, such as journaling, 16 publications were examined. One study reported 241 subjects, while the others reported 13-86 subjects. Method: Ten studies had adequate statistical reporting to calculate the d-statistic, allowing a comparison of effect size (ES) among studies. If multiple dependent variables were measured in one time period, the mean ES was used. A simple plot of the d-statistic ES against duration of practice illustrated the relationship of practice duration with strength of outcomes. Results: Plotting revealed effect sizes increased in relationship with time over the first 12 weeks of practice (ranging from ES of 0.4 to 1.0), however in two 18-week studies, ES (0.4) decreased in strength. No correlations were performed due to the small sample size. Conclusions: This study suggests that with increasing practice in imagery, outcomes improve initially and then level off at 3-5 months. The small sample size and the paucity of details of the interventions and participants&rsquo; practice patterns prohibit generalizing to all guided imagery interventions. The variety of outcomes in these studies decreases the ability to generalize further. As additional primary studies become available, a more thorough evaluation of interaction of time and guided imagery will be possible.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:52:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:52:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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