Prenatal health promotion content and satisfaction with care among low-income African-American and Mexican-American women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159289
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Prenatal health promotion content and satisfaction with care among low-income African-American and Mexican-American women
Abstract:
Prenatal health promotion content and satisfaction with care among low-income African-American and Mexican-American women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Vonderheid, Susan, PhD, RN
Title:Research Assistant Professor
Contact Address:CON, M/C 802 - Room 846, 845 South Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Co-Authors:Arden S. Handler, DrPH, Professor; Kathleen F. Norr, PhD, Professor
Background: Satisfaction with care is an important outcome of care, a measure of the quality of care, and has been associated with care utilization and adherence to provider recommendations. To improve the quality of prenatal care and increase satisfaction requires understanding the characteristics of care associated with satisfaction. Studies have shown that women want more information about pregnancy, prenatal care and parenting. These findings suggest that comprehensive health promotion content recommended by the Public Health Service Expert Panel on Prenatal Care could be a key strategy for improving satisfaction with care. Purpose: The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between health promotion content and satisfaction controlling for other prenatal care characteristics and maternal characteristics. Framework: Donabedian’s quality assessment model. Methods: This study analyzes data from a cross-sectional investigation that examined the relationship between prenatal health promotion content, satisfaction with care and maternal health behaviors. Data were collected using face-to-face interviews from 159 Mexican-American and African-American pregnant women attending prenatal care in a large Midwestern tertiary care center clinic who met the low-income criteria for Medicaid or state-subsidized health care coverage. Analyses included bivariate statistics and multiple regression to assess potential predictors of satisfaction with care. Results: Health promotion content, number of prenatal providers, waiting time at the site of care, insurance type, maternal birth country, and commitment to pregnancy had statistically significant independent relationships with satisfaction. While ethnic disparities in health promotion content were found, ethnicity was not a significant predictor of satisfaction with care. Conclusions: Health promotion content based on the Expert Panel is a key strategy under the control of providers to improve the quality of prenatal care and increase maternal satisfaction with care. Characteristics of the health care system, such as having a primary prenatal care provider, should also be addressed to increase satisfaction.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrenatal health promotion content and satisfaction with care among low-income African-American and Mexican-American womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159289-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Prenatal health promotion content and satisfaction with care among low-income African-American and Mexican-American women </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Vonderheid, Susan, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, M/C 802 - Room 846, 845 South Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Arden S. Handler, DrPH, Professor; Kathleen F. Norr, PhD, Professor </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Satisfaction with care is an important outcome of care, a measure of the quality of care, and has been associated with care utilization and adherence to provider recommendations. To improve the quality of prenatal care and increase satisfaction requires understanding the characteristics of care associated with satisfaction. Studies have shown that women want more information about pregnancy, prenatal care and parenting. These findings suggest that comprehensive health promotion content recommended by the Public Health Service Expert Panel on Prenatal Care could be a key strategy for improving satisfaction with care. Purpose: The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between health promotion content and satisfaction controlling for other prenatal care characteristics and maternal characteristics. Framework: Donabedian&rsquo;s quality assessment model. Methods: This study analyzes data from a cross-sectional investigation that examined the relationship between prenatal health promotion content, satisfaction with care and maternal health behaviors. Data were collected using face-to-face interviews from 159 Mexican-American and African-American pregnant women attending prenatal care in a large Midwestern tertiary care center clinic who met the low-income criteria for Medicaid or state-subsidized health care coverage. Analyses included bivariate statistics and multiple regression to assess potential predictors of satisfaction with care. Results: Health promotion content, number of prenatal providers, waiting time at the site of care, insurance type, maternal birth country, and commitment to pregnancy had statistically significant independent relationships with satisfaction. While ethnic disparities in health promotion content were found, ethnicity was not a significant predictor of satisfaction with care. Conclusions: Health promotion content based on the Expert Panel is a key strategy under the control of providers to improve the quality of prenatal care and increase maternal satisfaction with care. Characteristics of the health care system, such as having a primary prenatal care provider, should also be addressed to increase satisfaction.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:52:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:52:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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