2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159292
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stage Differences in Thirst Intensity and Beliefs Related to Fluid Adherence
Abstract:
Stage Differences in Thirst Intensity and Beliefs Related to Fluid Adherence
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Welch, Janet, DNS, RN
P.I. Institution Name:IUPUI
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Adult Health, 1111 Middle Drive, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA
Co-Authors:Susan M .Perkins, PhD; Jovier D. Evans, PhD; Sarita Bajpai, PhD
Little is known about factors associated with fluid adherence in patients receiving hemodialysis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether perceptions of barriers to and benefits of adherence to fluid limitations, perceived seriousness of and susceptibility to the consequences of nonadherence, self efficacy, and thirst intensity differed by stage of fluid adherence. The transtheoretical model for health behavior change and the health belief model provided the conceptual foundation for the study. There were 147 patients who participated in this cross-sectional descriptive study. Participants ranged in age from 20 to 88 (M=54), 57% were men, 57% were African American, and 68% were unmarried. Significant differences were found in perceived benefits, barriers, seriousness, susceptibility, and thirst intensity by stage of fluid adherence when analyzed by ANOVA. Compared to those in the preparation stage, persons in the precontemplation stage perceived both fewer barriers and fewer benefits, perceived the consequences of nonadherence as less serious, and perceived themselves to be less susceptible to the complications of nonadherence. Furthermore, compared to those in the contemplation stage, persons in the precontemplation stage also perceived fewer benefits and perceived the seriousness of consequences as less of a threat. Additionally, persons in the preparation stage experienced more thirst intensity compared to those in the action/maintenance stage. There were no significant differences in self-efficacy by stage of fluid adherence. Developing and testing stage-specific interventions may be especially important for individuals in the precontemplation stage and may help them to take important steps toward fluid adherence. Clinical efforts should also be directly toward individuals in the preparation stage, especially in reducing thirst intensity.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStage Differences in Thirst Intensity and Beliefs Related to Fluid Adherenceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159292-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Stage Differences in Thirst Intensity and Beliefs Related to Fluid Adherence </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Welch, Janet, DNS, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">IUPUI</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Adult Health, 1111 Middle Drive, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan M .Perkins, PhD; Jovier D. Evans, PhD; Sarita Bajpai, PhD </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Little is known about factors associated with fluid adherence in patients receiving hemodialysis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether perceptions of barriers to and benefits of adherence to fluid limitations, perceived seriousness of and susceptibility to the consequences of nonadherence, self efficacy, and thirst intensity differed by stage of fluid adherence. The transtheoretical model for health behavior change and the health belief model provided the conceptual foundation for the study. There were 147 patients who participated in this cross-sectional descriptive study. Participants ranged in age from 20 to 88 (M=54), 57% were men, 57% were African American, and 68% were unmarried. Significant differences were found in perceived benefits, barriers, seriousness, susceptibility, and thirst intensity by stage of fluid adherence when analyzed by ANOVA. Compared to those in the preparation stage, persons in the precontemplation stage perceived both fewer barriers and fewer benefits, perceived the consequences of nonadherence as less serious, and perceived themselves to be less susceptible to the complications of nonadherence. Furthermore, compared to those in the contemplation stage, persons in the precontemplation stage also perceived fewer benefits and perceived the seriousness of consequences as less of a threat. Additionally, persons in the preparation stage experienced more thirst intensity compared to those in the action/maintenance stage. There were no significant differences in self-efficacy by stage of fluid adherence. Developing and testing stage-specific interventions may be especially important for individuals in the precontemplation stage and may help them to take important steps toward fluid adherence. Clinical efforts should also be directly toward individuals in the preparation stage, especially in reducing thirst intensity.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:52:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:52:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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