Outcomes of Family Centered Maternity Care Nursing Practices in Breastfeeding Mothers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159293
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Outcomes of Family Centered Maternity Care Nursing Practices in Breastfeeding Mothers
Abstract:
Outcomes of Family Centered Maternity Care Nursing Practices in Breastfeeding Mothers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Wheeler, Sarah, BA, RN
Contact Address:CON, PO Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI, 53201-1881 , USA
Co-Authors:Marianne E. Weiss, DNSc, RN, Associate Professor; Lisa Lokken, MSN, RN
The role of postpartum nursing, modeled on family centered maternity care principles, in promoting healthy outcomes for breastfeeding families was the subject of this study. Specifically, the purpose was to determine the relationships between family-centered maternity care nursing practices, readiness for discharge, maternal breastfeeding confidence, and breastfeeding continuation through 3 weeks postpartum. Methods: A longitudinal comparative and correlational design was used. Data were collected in hospital prior to discharge and at 3 weeks postpartum by telephone interview. The following instruments were used: FCMC nursing practices survey, with subscales of rooming together, breastfeeding support, education/mother, education/support person (developed by the study team); Readiness for Discharge After Birth Scale (Weiss, Ryan, Lokken); Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale - Short Form (Dennis); Breastfeeding Level (Labbok & Krasovec). Socio-demographic and birth data were also obtained (age, parity, marital status, socioeconomic status, type of birth) Subjects: The sample consisted of 206 English speaking postpartum mothers > 18 years who initiated breastfeeding following a birth of >36 completed weeks gestation and an uncomplicated postpartum course. The mean age was 30.2 years, 82% were married, 71.8% were white, 21.4% were African-American, and 60.5% had a college degree. Results: Postpartum mothers who received FCMC nursing practices had higher scores on the RDBS and BSES at discharge and at 3 weeks postpartum (p<0.05). There were significant correlations between RDBS and BSES/Discharge (r=0.447), RDBS and BSES/3weeks (r=0.334), and BSES/Discharge and BSES/3weeks (r=0.565). 15.4% of mothers quit breastfeeding in the first 3 weeks postpartum and an additional 19% reduced their level of breastfeeding. Quitting and reduction were associated with breastfeeding support practices and adequacy of education for the mother and support person. Conclusions: FCMC nursing interventions that promote readiness for discharge and breastfeeding confidence offer promise for improving breastfeeding continuation rates and ultimately meeting national health goals for breastfeeding.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOutcomes of Family Centered Maternity Care Nursing Practices in Breastfeeding Mothersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159293-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Outcomes of Family Centered Maternity Care Nursing Practices in Breastfeeding Mothers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wheeler, Sarah, BA, RN </td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">CON, PO Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI, 53201-1881 , USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marianne E. Weiss, DNSc, RN, Associate Professor; Lisa Lokken, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The role of postpartum nursing, modeled on family centered maternity care principles, in promoting healthy outcomes for breastfeeding families was the subject of this study. Specifically, the purpose was to determine the relationships between family-centered maternity care nursing practices, readiness for discharge, maternal breastfeeding confidence, and breastfeeding continuation through 3 weeks postpartum. Methods: A longitudinal comparative and correlational design was used. Data were collected in hospital prior to discharge and at 3 weeks postpartum by telephone interview. The following instruments were used: FCMC nursing practices survey, with subscales of rooming together, breastfeeding support, education/mother, education/support person (developed by the study team); Readiness for Discharge After Birth Scale (Weiss, Ryan, Lokken); Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale - Short Form (Dennis); Breastfeeding Level (Labbok &amp; Krasovec). Socio-demographic and birth data were also obtained (age, parity, marital status, socioeconomic status, type of birth) Subjects: The sample consisted of 206 English speaking postpartum mothers &gt; 18 years who initiated breastfeeding following a birth of &gt;36 completed weeks gestation and an uncomplicated postpartum course. The mean age was 30.2 years, 82% were married, 71.8% were white, 21.4% were African-American, and 60.5% had a college degree. Results: Postpartum mothers who received FCMC nursing practices had higher scores on the RDBS and BSES at discharge and at 3 weeks postpartum (p&lt;0.05). There were significant correlations between RDBS and BSES/Discharge (r=0.447), RDBS and BSES/3weeks (r=0.334), and BSES/Discharge and BSES/3weeks (r=0.565). 15.4% of mothers quit breastfeeding in the first 3 weeks postpartum and an additional 19% reduced their level of breastfeeding. Quitting and reduction were associated with breastfeeding support practices and adequacy of education for the mother and support person. Conclusions: FCMC nursing interventions that promote readiness for discharge and breastfeeding confidence offer promise for improving breastfeeding continuation rates and ultimately meeting national health goals for breastfeeding.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:52:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:52:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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