2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159297
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Calcium Intake and Osteoporosis Among Chinese Residing in Michigan, USA
Abstract:
Calcium Intake and Osteoporosis Among Chinese Residing in Michigan, USA
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2004
Author:Yu, Mei-Yu, PhD, MD
Title:Associate Research Scientist
Contact Address:SON , 400 North Ingalls - RM 3248, Ann Arbor, MI, 48105, USA
Co-Authors:Lixin Song, MSN, RN; Cuijuan Cai, PhD, MS; Yangyang Liu
Asian Americans are among the populations at the highest risk of developing osteoporosis -a silent disease that typically progresses without symptoms until a fracture occurs. Adequate calcium intake is critical to achieving optimal peak bone mass and modifying the rate of bone loss associated with aging. The objective of this study is to investigate Asian Americans' calcium intake and the important factors that affect the intake. The research design is to collect dietary information on a typical day from the research participants. The Interactive Healthy Eating Index (IHEI) developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture was used as an online dietary assessment tool to analyze the overall quality of people¢ diet, including calcium intake. In 2003, the pilot project gathered dietary information from a convenient sample of 64 Chinese 44 years old and older (mean age=63) residing in an urban county of Michigan, USA. All 64 Chinese were immigrants, including 37 women and 27 men (mean years lived in the U.S.=12.3). Of the research participants, 95% were married, 47% had a college or graduate degree, and 14% could speak English. The data analysis reported that, out of the 64 Chinese, 97% of them failed to meet the recommended guidelines for optimal calcium intake. The dietary information indicated that a significant proportion of Asians, especially first-generation immigrants, are unable to digest milk and many calcium rich foods. Moreover, 63% of the research participants did not use calcium supplements. Multiple logistic regressions suggested that after controlling for all other confounding factors, educational level of the subjects was a significant predictor for the use of calcium supplements (p=.014). There is an urgent need to conduct culturally sensitive preventive program for Asian Americans and immigrants.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCalcium Intake and Osteoporosis Among Chinese Residing in Michigan, USAen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159297-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Calcium Intake and Osteoporosis Among Chinese Residing in Michigan, USA </td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yu, Mei-Yu, PhD, MD</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Research Scientist</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">SON , 400 North Ingalls - RM 3248, Ann Arbor, MI, 48105, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lixin Song, MSN, RN; Cuijuan Cai, PhD, MS; Yangyang Liu </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Asian Americans are among the populations at the highest risk of developing osteoporosis -a silent disease that typically progresses without symptoms until a fracture occurs. Adequate calcium intake is critical to achieving optimal peak bone mass and modifying the rate of bone loss associated with aging. The objective of this study is to investigate Asian Americans' calcium intake and the important factors that affect the intake. The research design is to collect dietary information on a typical day from the research participants. The Interactive Healthy Eating Index (IHEI) developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture was used as an online dietary assessment tool to analyze the overall quality of people&cent; diet, including calcium intake. In 2003, the pilot project gathered dietary information from a convenient sample of 64 Chinese 44 years old and older (mean age=63) residing in an urban county of Michigan, USA. All 64 Chinese were immigrants, including 37 women and 27 men (mean years lived in the U.S.=12.3). Of the research participants, 95% were married, 47% had a college or graduate degree, and 14% could speak English. The data analysis reported that, out of the 64 Chinese, 97% of them failed to meet the recommended guidelines for optimal calcium intake. The dietary information indicated that a significant proportion of Asians, especially first-generation immigrants, are unable to digest milk and many calcium rich foods. Moreover, 63% of the research participants did not use calcium supplements. Multiple logistic regressions suggested that after controlling for all other confounding factors, educational level of the subjects was a significant predictor for the use of calcium supplements (p=.014). There is an urgent need to conduct culturally sensitive preventive program for Asian Americans and immigrants. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:53:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:53:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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