Utilizing standardized assessment measures in large data sets: A study of Missouri nursing homes using Nursing Home Compare

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159299
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Utilizing standardized assessment measures in large data sets: A study of Missouri nursing homes using Nursing Home Compare
Abstract:
Utilizing standardized assessment measures in large data sets: A study of Missouri nursing homes using Nursing Home Compare
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Alexander, Gregory, MHA, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Missouri-Columbia
Title:Pre-doctoral Fellow
Contact Address:Sinclair School of Nursing, 324 Clark Hall, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA
Contact Telephone:573-882-2803
Co-Authors:Marilyn Rantz, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor
Nursing homes have a long history of mandates from Congress to improve
quality of care. The Omnibus Reconciliation Act of 1987 included
provisions to improve nursing home care. These provisions called for
developing The Minimum Data Set for Resident Assessment and Care
Screening. Nursing Home Compare available at www.medicare.gov contains
information about all 14 quality measures (QMs) collected in nursing
homes. This study evaluated nursing home facility QM scores, obtained from
the NHC national database, in Missouri. Staffing measures, number of
hours/resident/day, for RNs, LVNs, and CNAs were evaluated to determine
differences in QMs associated with staffing levels. For this study, the
NHC database was downloaded in February 2004. ANOVA procedures were used
to determine differences in scores associated with different levels of
staffing in Missouri nursing homes. Statistical measures in 3 QMs revealed
differences in-group means: Two chronic, 1) residents who loose bowel
control, 2) residents whose need for help with daily activities increased,
and one post-acute, 3) short stay residents with moderate to severe pain,
revealed differences in means of CNAs and RN/LPN groups, respectively.
ANOVA results measuring low risk residents who loose bowel control
indicated significant differences in CNA groups. ANOVA for residents whose
need for help with daily activities showed significant main effects in the
RN and LPN groups. Finally, ANOVA for short stay residents with moderate
to severe pain, indicated significant differences in LPN groups. The only
significant interaction with number/residents/facility occurred in short
stay residents who had moderate to severe pain. Nursing home quality
measures are important to determine the level of quality nursing homes
offer. Large national datasets providing data about nursing home quality
play an important role in consumersÆ ability to choose a nursing home or
researchersÆ ability to recommend best practice standards with the nursing
home setting.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUtilizing standardized assessment measures in large data sets: A study of Missouri nursing homes using Nursing Home Compareen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159299-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Utilizing standardized assessment measures in large data sets: A study of Missouri nursing homes using Nursing Home Compare</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Alexander, Gregory, MHA, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Missouri-Columbia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Pre-doctoral Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Sinclair School of Nursing, 324 Clark Hall, Columbia, MO, 65211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">573-882-2803</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gla1d7@mizzou.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marilyn Rantz, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nursing homes have a long history of mandates from Congress to improve <br/> quality of care. The Omnibus Reconciliation Act of 1987 included <br/> provisions to improve nursing home care. These provisions called for <br/> developing The Minimum Data Set for Resident Assessment and Care <br/> Screening. Nursing Home Compare available at www.medicare.gov contains <br/> information about all 14 quality measures (QMs) collected in nursing <br/> homes. This study evaluated nursing home facility QM scores, obtained from <br/> the NHC national database, in Missouri. Staffing measures, number of <br/> hours/resident/day, for RNs, LVNs, and CNAs were evaluated to determine <br/> differences in QMs associated with staffing levels. For this study, the <br/> NHC database was downloaded in February 2004. ANOVA procedures were used <br/> to determine differences in scores associated with different levels of <br/> staffing in Missouri nursing homes. Statistical measures in 3 QMs revealed <br/> differences in-group means: Two chronic, 1) residents who loose bowel <br/> control, 2) residents whose need for help with daily activities increased, <br/> and one post-acute, 3) short stay residents with moderate to severe pain, <br/> revealed differences in means of CNAs and RN/LPN groups, respectively. <br/> ANOVA results measuring low risk residents who loose bowel control <br/> indicated significant differences in CNA groups. ANOVA for residents whose <br/> need for help with daily activities showed significant main effects in the <br/> RN and LPN groups. Finally, ANOVA for short stay residents with moderate <br/> to severe pain, indicated significant differences in LPN groups. The only <br/> significant interaction with number/residents/facility occurred in short <br/> stay residents who had moderate to severe pain. Nursing home quality <br/> measures are important to determine the level of quality nursing homes <br/> offer. Large national datasets providing data about nursing home quality <br/> play an important role in consumers&AElig; ability to choose a nursing home or <br/> researchers&AElig; ability to recommend best practice standards with the nursing <br/> home setting.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:53:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:53:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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