2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159301
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comprehensive Review of Dementia Care Research
Abstract:
Comprehensive Review of Dementia Care Research
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Algase, Donna, PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Director
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls, Rm 2320, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA
Contact Telephone:(734) 615-3714
Co-Authors:Elizabeth Beattie, PhD, RN, Assistant Research Scientist; Jung Hee Kim, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; Lan Yao, PhD, Assistant Research Scientist; Gwi-Ryung Son, PhD, RN, Assistant Research Scientist; and Young Mi Lim, PhD, RN, Associate Professor
Growth in the elderly population inevitably increases the number with
dementia and heightens need for evidence-based nursing care. To guide
nurse researchers in developing such evidence, we undertook to summarize
the state of nursing science in dementia care and to reveal its areas of
strength and weakness. The universe of relevant literature (N=58,000+) was
identified from the Medline database for a 15-year period using the key
term: dementia. Citations were narrowed in a stepwise process to only
those that were written in English, fell within the domain of nursing, and
represented a systematic approach to knowledge development; remaining
abstracts (n=~2200) were entered into a bibliographic database and coded
using an initial scheme representing the substantive and syntactical
structure of nursing within the realm of dementia care. After 15% of the
abstracts were coded, the schema was refined through a consensus process.
On the substantive knowledge base, preliminary results indicate that: 1)
most studies focused on the person with dementia, with fewer studies about
caregivers; 2) few studies consider environmental factors other than care
setting; 3) a large proportion of studies are concerned with physical and
psychological functioning with much less emphasis on social functioning
and quality of life; and 4) a very small number of studies examined safety
issues and nursing diagnoses. On the syntactical structure of nursing,
preliminary results indicate that: 1) the preponderance of studies are
empirical and quantitative; 2) cross-sectional and survey designs are
predominant; and 3) a wide array of methods have been used, but use of
technologically-based approaches are rare. In future studies, we recommend
greater emphasis on dyads, social and physical environs, interventions,
safety, and a wider array of care settings; on qualitative studies to
improve understanding of key phenomena; and on testing theories and models
as a guide to intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComprehensive Review of Dementia Care Researchen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159301-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comprehensive Review of Dementia Care Research</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Algase, Donna, PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls, Rm 2320, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(734) 615-3714</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dalgase@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Elizabeth Beattie, PhD, RN, Assistant Research Scientist; Jung Hee Kim, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; Lan Yao, PhD, Assistant Research Scientist; Gwi-Ryung Son, PhD, RN, Assistant Research Scientist; and Young Mi Lim, PhD, RN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Growth in the elderly population inevitably increases the number with <br/> dementia and heightens need for evidence-based nursing care. To guide <br/> nurse researchers in developing such evidence, we undertook to summarize <br/> the state of nursing science in dementia care and to reveal its areas of <br/> strength and weakness. The universe of relevant literature (N=58,000+) was <br/> identified from the Medline database for a 15-year period using the key <br/> term: dementia. Citations were narrowed in a stepwise process to only <br/> those that were written in English, fell within the domain of nursing, and <br/> represented a systematic approach to knowledge development; remaining <br/> abstracts (n=~2200) were entered into a bibliographic database and coded <br/> using an initial scheme representing the substantive and syntactical <br/> structure of nursing within the realm of dementia care. After 15% of the <br/> abstracts were coded, the schema was refined through a consensus process. <br/> On the substantive knowledge base, preliminary results indicate that: 1) <br/> most studies focused on the person with dementia, with fewer studies about <br/> caregivers; 2) few studies consider environmental factors other than care <br/> setting; 3) a large proportion of studies are concerned with physical and <br/> psychological functioning with much less emphasis on social functioning <br/> and quality of life; and 4) a very small number of studies examined safety <br/> issues and nursing diagnoses. On the syntactical structure of nursing, <br/> preliminary results indicate that: 1) the preponderance of studies are <br/> empirical and quantitative; 2) cross-sectional and survey designs are <br/> predominant; and 3) a wide array of methods have been used, but use of <br/> technologically-based approaches are rare. In future studies, we recommend <br/> greater emphasis on dyads, social and physical environs, interventions, <br/> safety, and a wider array of care settings; on qualitative studies to <br/> improve understanding of key phenomena; and on testing theories and models <br/> as a guide to intervention.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:53:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:53:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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