2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159303
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Infant Feeding Theories: A Guide to Practice
Abstract:
Infant Feeding Theories: A Guide to Practice
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Baack, Cathryn, RN, MSN, CPNP, PhDc
P.I. Institution Name:Ohio State University
Title:Predoctoral Student
Contact Address:Pediatric Nursing, Ohio Union, Rm 208, 1739 N. High Street, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA
Contact Telephone:614-688-3645
Co-Authors:Deborah Steward, PhD, RN, Associate Professor
There have been many articles written about infant feeding disorders
that have not specified a theoretical framework that was used to guide the
researcher. Much of what has been written about feeding disorders outside
of the realms of the premature infant have been informative in nature, not
true experimental or quasi-experimental research. In order to expand the
state of the science in relation to infant feeding disorders, it is
important to become aware of the appropriate theories on which to base
research. The purpose of this paper is to look at the theoretical
perspectives that have been used in the investigation of infant feeding
behaviors.
Several grand theories of development have been utilized to elucidate the
importance of parent-infant interaction in infant development. These
include EriksonÆs theory of psychosocial development, PiagetÆs theory of
cognitive development, and the transactional model of normal and abnormal
behavior.
The Synactive Model of Behavioral Organization was developed as a
framework for studying the behavioral organization of premature infants.
The Child Health Assessment Model was developed as a framework to study
the ways caregiver-infant interaction and the environment affect the
development of an infant. The theory of attachment was developed and
refined to assess parent-infant interactions.
The study of infant feeding encompasses many different points along the
continuum of health and illness as well as covering numerous age levels.
While there has been many informative articles written about caring for
children with feeding disorders, much more has been published in allied
medical fields than in nursing, and there is not much in the way of
concept analysis or theory development. New technology has allowed more
children with feeding problems to survive and thus there is a new need for
theory development, including the incorporation of alternative theories to
guide nursing practice in caring for these children.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInfant Feeding Theories: A Guide to Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159303-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Infant Feeding Theories: A Guide to Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Baack, Cathryn, RN, MSN, CPNP, PhDc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ohio State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Predoctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Pediatric Nursing, Ohio Union, Rm 208, 1739 N. High Street, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">614-688-3645</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">baack.4@osu.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Deborah Steward, PhD, RN, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">There have been many articles written about infant feeding disorders <br/> that have not specified a theoretical framework that was used to guide the <br/> researcher. Much of what has been written about feeding disorders outside <br/> of the realms of the premature infant have been informative in nature, not <br/> true experimental or quasi-experimental research. In order to expand the <br/> state of the science in relation to infant feeding disorders, it is <br/> important to become aware of the appropriate theories on which to base <br/> research. The purpose of this paper is to look at the theoretical <br/> perspectives that have been used in the investigation of infant feeding <br/> behaviors.<br/> Several grand theories of development have been utilized to elucidate the <br/> importance of parent-infant interaction in infant development. These <br/> include Erikson&AElig;s theory of psychosocial development, Piaget&AElig;s theory of <br/> cognitive development, and the transactional model of normal and abnormal <br/> behavior. <br/> The Synactive Model of Behavioral Organization was developed as a <br/> framework for studying the behavioral organization of premature infants. <br/> The Child Health Assessment Model was developed as a framework to study <br/> the ways caregiver-infant interaction and the environment affect the <br/> development of an infant. The theory of attachment was developed and <br/> refined to assess parent-infant interactions. <br/> The study of infant feeding encompasses many different points along the <br/> continuum of health and illness as well as covering numerous age levels. <br/> While there has been many informative articles written about caring for <br/> children with feeding disorders, much more has been published in allied <br/> medical fields than in nursing, and there is not much in the way of <br/> concept analysis or theory development. New technology has allowed more <br/> children with feeding problems to survive and thus there is a new need for <br/> theory development, including the incorporation of alternative theories to <br/> guide nursing practice in caring for these children.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:53:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:53:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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