2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159304
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Living with a chronically depressed mother
Abstract:
Living with a chronically depressed mother
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Baik, Seong-Yi, PhD, RN, CNAA
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 262 Procter Hall 3110 Vine St, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0038, USA
Contact Telephone:(513)-558-5219
Co-Authors:Barbara J. Bowers, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor
The purpose of this study was to understand offspring's experiences of
living with their depressed mothers and, especially, to understand how
these offspring disclose the information about having a depressed mother
to others. Eight in-depth, in-person interviews were conducted with adult
children of depressed mothers. All interviews were audiotaped and
transcribed for the analysis. Grounded theory methodology was used to
collect and analyze the data. The analysis identified three types of
disclosing: "disclosing to self as discovery," "first disclosing," and
"selective disclosing." The results indicate that disclosing information
about having a depressed mother occurs as a sequence of handling
information over time rather than as a single episode. As the children of
depressed mothers grew up and began to increase their understanding of
their mother's depression, their way of disclosing their mothers'
depression changed, as did what they disclosed, where, when, and for what
purposes. Most significantly, what is disclosed changed remarkably over
time, depending on the offspring's perception of the problem, safety, the
purpose of disclosing, and the anticipated consequences of disclosing.
Implications for health policies and health services for children of
depressed mothers are discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLiving with a chronically depressed motheren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159304-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Living with a chronically depressed mother</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Baik, Seong-Yi, PhD, RN, CNAA</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 262 Procter Hall 3110 Vine St, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0038, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(513)-558-5219</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">seongyi.baik@uc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Barbara J. Bowers, PhD, RN, FAAN, Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to understand offspring's experiences of <br/> living with their depressed mothers and, especially, to understand how <br/> these offspring disclose the information about having a depressed mother <br/> to others. Eight in-depth, in-person interviews were conducted with adult <br/> children of depressed mothers. All interviews were audiotaped and <br/> transcribed for the analysis. Grounded theory methodology was used to <br/> collect and analyze the data. The analysis identified three types of <br/> disclosing: &quot;disclosing to self as discovery,&quot; &quot;first disclosing,&quot; and <br/> &quot;selective disclosing.&quot; The results indicate that disclosing information <br/> about having a depressed mother occurs as a sequence of handling <br/> information over time rather than as a single episode. As the children of <br/> depressed mothers grew up and began to increase their understanding of <br/> their mother's depression, their way of disclosing their mothers'<br/> depression changed, as did what they disclosed, where, when, and for what <br/> purposes. Most significantly, what is disclosed changed remarkably over <br/> time, depending on the offspring's perception of the problem, safety, the <br/> purpose of disclosing, and the anticipated consequences of disclosing. <br/> Implications for health policies and health services for children of <br/> depressed mothers are discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:53:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:53:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.