Challenges to Implementing a Brief Intervention Protocol for Risky Behaviors in an Urban Emergency Department

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159311
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Challenges to Implementing a Brief Intervention Protocol for Risky Behaviors in an Urban Emergency Department
Abstract:
Challenges to Implementing a Brief Intervention Protocol for Risky Behaviors in an Urban Emergency Department
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Bobst, Marcelle
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
Contact Address:College of Nursing, PO Box 210038, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0038, USA
Contact Telephone:513-558-5268
Co-Authors:Dawn Clark and Marilyn Sommers, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Dean
Risky behavior is a critical social problem and leading cause of injury and death among young adults. This abstract will describe the experience of enrolling subjects in a behavioral randomized controlled trial (RCT) in an urban emergency department (ED). Purpose: To explore challenges that occur during enrollment for a RCT testing the effectiveness of brief intervention to reduce problem drinking in young adults seen in the ED. Theoretical Framework: An ED visit is conceptualized as a crisis during which people are willing to consider behavioral changes that will reduce the risk of future adverse health events. Subjects: Young adults ages 18-44 who screen positive for problem drinking and risky driving are eligible for enrollment. Method: The RCT has three groups: no contact controls (subjects are enrolled at baseline and screened 12 months following the ED visit), contact controls who do not receive the intervention but are screened at baseline, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months, and the brief intervention group, also screened at baseline, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Outcome variables include alcohol consumption, driving behaviors, health care utilization, and health care cost. Results: We are enrolling subjects several days/week and have found the following challenges: 1) Environmental distraction- the ED environment is one of activity, noise, anxiety, diversity, and boredom. 2) Timing of screening and intervention- the amount of time subjects have been waiting for care affects their willingness to consent to the study. 3) Type and extent of injury/illness- some people have too much pain or emotional burden to answer a screening questionnaire. 4) Personal comfort- subjects' comfort during screening depends on the number of people in the immediate environment during the screening process. Conclusions: Subject enrollment in a busy urban ED environment is possible, but requires skill and flexibility by the study team.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChallenges to Implementing a Brief Intervention Protocol for Risky Behaviors in an Urban Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159311-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Challenges to Implementing a Brief Intervention Protocol for Risky Behaviors in an Urban Emergency Department</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bobst, Marcelle</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, PO Box 210038, Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0038, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">513-558-5268</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">marcellebobst@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Dawn Clark and Marilyn Sommers, PhD, RN, FAAN, Associate Dean</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Risky behavior is a critical social problem and leading cause of injury and death among young adults. This abstract will describe the experience of enrolling subjects in a behavioral randomized controlled trial (RCT) in an urban emergency department (ED). Purpose: To explore challenges that occur during enrollment for a RCT testing the effectiveness of brief intervention to reduce problem drinking in young adults seen in the ED. Theoretical Framework: An ED visit is conceptualized as a crisis during which people are willing to consider behavioral changes that will reduce the risk of future adverse health events. Subjects: Young adults ages 18-44 who screen positive for problem drinking and risky driving are eligible for enrollment. Method: The RCT has three groups: no contact controls (subjects are enrolled at baseline and screened 12 months following the ED visit), contact controls who do not receive the intervention but are screened at baseline, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months, and the brief intervention group, also screened at baseline, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Outcome variables include alcohol consumption, driving behaviors, health care utilization, and health care cost. Results: We are enrolling subjects several days/week and have found the following challenges: 1) Environmental distraction- the ED environment is one of activity, noise, anxiety, diversity, and boredom. 2) Timing of screening and intervention- the amount of time subjects have been waiting for care affects their willingness to consent to the study. 3) Type and extent of injury/illness- some people have too much pain or emotional burden to answer a screening questionnaire. 4) Personal comfort- subjects' comfort during screening depends on the number of people in the immediate environment during the screening process. Conclusions: Subject enrollment in a busy urban ED environment is possible, but requires skill and flexibility by the study team.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:53:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:53:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.