2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159313
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Home Residents, Family Members, & Staff: Who's Satisfied with What?
Abstract:
Nursing Home Residents, Family Members, & Staff: Who's Satisfied with What?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Bott, Marjorie, PhD, BS - Study Contact
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kansas Medical Center
Title:Associate Dean for Research
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3901 Rainbow Blvd Mail Stop 4043, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA
Contact Telephone:913-588-1692
Co-Authors:Ubolrat Piamjariyakul, PhD, RN, Project Director; and Roma Lee Taunton, PhD, RN, FAAN, Principal Investigator
With greater life expectancy, more individuals living with chronic
illnesses are requiring nursing homes care to meet their daily needs.
Resident and family satisfaction with the nursing home experience is an
important outcome of care. The purpose of this study is to examine the
relationships among resident, family members, and staff satisfaction with
care. Subjects included direct care staff (n=408), residents (n=257), and
family members (n=316) from 10 facilities in two Midwestern states.
Although there was some overlap, residents and family member were not
matched within facilities. Most staff and residents were white (73%, 94%)
and women (91%, 72%). Most often, family members were a son or daughter
(48%) or a spouse (15%). The vast majority of residents (95%) and most
family members (63%) were 65 years or older. Satisfaction data were
collected from staff via paper questionnaires. Residents (individual
interview) and families (mailed survey) completed the R.E.A.L. survey.
Each of the tools included multiple subscales. MANOVA and ANOVA procedures
were used to analyze the data. Residents, family members, and staff
reported moderate to high satisfaction. Between facilities, there were
significant differences on staff satisfaction with Quality of Care (QOC)
(F(9, 395)=3.8, p < .01), but no differences on Job Enjoyment. Lower staff
QOC satisfaction scores were associated with lower resident and family
member Overall Satisfaction scores. If residents were less satisfied,
family members also were less satisfied. Communication and
food/environment were significant satisfaction variables among both
residents and families. In addition, autonomy, help/assistance,
support/encouragement, and staff competence were significant variables
among families. Subject satisfaction scores were not associated with
ownership, location, or percent Medicaid days. ConsumersÆ satisfaction
scores generally are high in health care settings. Combining staff
satisfaction regarding quality of care with consumer satisfaction data may
be useful in identifying potential quality improvement issues in nursing
homes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Home Residents, Family Members, & Staff: Who's Satisfied with What?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159313-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Home Residents, Family Members, &amp; Staff: Who's Satisfied with What?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bott, Marjorie, PhD, BS - Study Contact</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kansas Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean for Research</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3901 Rainbow Blvd Mail Stop 4043, Kansas City, KS, 66160, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">913-588-1692</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mbott@kumc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ubolrat Piamjariyakul, PhD, RN, Project Director; and Roma Lee Taunton, PhD, RN, FAAN, Principal Investigator</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">With greater life expectancy, more individuals living with chronic <br/> illnesses are requiring nursing homes care to meet their daily needs. <br/> Resident and family satisfaction with the nursing home experience is an <br/> important outcome of care. The purpose of this study is to examine the <br/> relationships among resident, family members, and staff satisfaction with <br/> care. Subjects included direct care staff (n=408), residents (n=257), and <br/> family members (n=316) from 10 facilities in two Midwestern states. <br/> Although there was some overlap, residents and family member were not <br/> matched within facilities. Most staff and residents were white (73%, 94%) <br/> and women (91%, 72%). Most often, family members were a son or daughter <br/> (48%) or a spouse (15%). The vast majority of residents (95%) and most <br/> family members (63%) were 65 years or older. Satisfaction data were <br/> collected from staff via paper questionnaires. Residents (individual <br/> interview) and families (mailed survey) completed the R.E.A.L. survey. <br/> Each of the tools included multiple subscales. MANOVA and ANOVA procedures <br/> were used to analyze the data. Residents, family members, and staff <br/> reported moderate to high satisfaction. Between facilities, there were <br/> significant differences on staff satisfaction with Quality of Care (QOC) <br/> (F(9, 395)=3.8, p &lt; .01), but no differences on Job Enjoyment. Lower staff <br/> QOC satisfaction scores were associated with lower resident and family <br/> member Overall Satisfaction scores. If residents were less satisfied, <br/> family members also were less satisfied. Communication and <br/> food/environment were significant satisfaction variables among both <br/> residents and families. In addition, autonomy, help/assistance, <br/> support/encouragement, and staff competence were significant variables <br/> among families. Subject satisfaction scores were not associated with <br/> ownership, location, or percent Medicaid days. Consumers&AElig; satisfaction <br/> scores generally are high in health care settings. Combining staff <br/> satisfaction regarding quality of care with consumer satisfaction data may <br/> be useful in identifying potential quality improvement issues in nursing <br/> homes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:54:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:54:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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