A Qualitative Descriptive Study of the Experience of Total Knee Replacement Surgery

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159315
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Qualitative Descriptive Study of the Experience of Total Knee Replacement Surgery
Abstract:
A Qualitative Descriptive Study of the Experience of Total Knee Replacement Surgery
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Bright, Natalie, BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Kent State University
Title:Graduate Research Assistant
Contact Address:College of Nursing, PO Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242, USA
Contact Telephone:330-672-8815
Co-Authors:Ann F. Jacobson, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; Rodney Myerscough, PhD, Psychologist; Kirsten DeLambo, PhD, Post Doctoral Fellow; Eileen Fleming, MSN, RN, Research Coordinator; Amy Huddleston, PhD, Psychologist; and Joseph Varley, MD, Department Head
Purpose: Although pregnancy is an opportune time for smoking
cessation, 70% of women return to smoking postpartum. Behavior change
models have been useful in our efforts to help people become non-smokers.
However, translation of these models for use in practice with special
patient populations is often a challenge. The purpose of this study is to
test the effectiveness of our resumption-prevention intervention.
Conceptual Framework: We have developed a smoking resumption-prevention
model based on Deci and RyanÆs motivational theory that includes
intrinsic, extrinsic, and pregnancy-specific sources of motivation. These
sources of motivation are categorized and measured as bio-behavioral
(dependence, readiness, self-efficacy), pregnancy-specific (concerns for
the fetus, changes in sensory response to tobacco), and co-conditions
(partner/household smoking and support, depression, and weight concerns).
Participants: The sample is pregnant women age 18 or older who have been
continuously abstinent from smoking from 28-32 weeks of pregnancy.
Methods: The design of this study uses a treatment group and an historical
control group. Women are recruited from prenatal clinics and at 34 weeks
of pregnancy and are risk-assessed based on our modelÆs sources of
motivation. Treatment group women are triaged to one of four levels of
stepped-care, and receive at least one in-person and 4 telephone
counseling sessions through the first 3 months postpartum. The
intervention uses processes consistent with clinical practice and includes
assessment of sources of motivation, risk profiling, triaging women to
different levels of intervention intensity, and matching theory-based
intervention strategies to the risk profile. Intervention strategies
include motivational interviewing, enhancing self-efficacy, anticipating
and planning for high risk parenting and social situations, and referrals
for depression and weight control. Results: Outcomes are 1 and 3-month
postpartum smoking resumption rates which will be compared using Chi
square analyses. The study is in progress and preliminary findings will be
presented.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Qualitative Descriptive Study of the Experience of Total Knee Replacement Surgeryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159315-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Qualitative Descriptive Study of the Experience of Total Knee Replacement Surgery</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bright, Natalie, BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Kent State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Graduate Research Assistant</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, PO Box 5190, Kent, OH, 44242, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330-672-8815</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">nvolkov@kent.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ann F. Jacobson, PhD, RN, Associate Professor; Rodney Myerscough, PhD, Psychologist; Kirsten DeLambo, PhD, Post Doctoral Fellow; Eileen Fleming, MSN, RN, Research Coordinator; Amy Huddleston, PhD, Psychologist; and Joseph Varley, MD, Department Head</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Although pregnancy is an opportune time for smoking <br/> cessation, 70% of women return to smoking postpartum. Behavior change <br/> models have been useful in our efforts to help people become non-smokers. <br/> However, translation of these models for use in practice with special <br/> patient populations is often a challenge. The purpose of this study is to <br/> test the effectiveness of our resumption-prevention intervention. <br/> Conceptual Framework: We have developed a smoking resumption-prevention <br/> model based on Deci and Ryan&AElig;s motivational theory that includes <br/> intrinsic, extrinsic, and pregnancy-specific sources of motivation. These <br/> sources of motivation are categorized and measured as bio-behavioral <br/> (dependence, readiness, self-efficacy), pregnancy-specific (concerns for <br/> the fetus, changes in sensory response to tobacco), and co-conditions <br/> (partner/household smoking and support, depression, and weight concerns). <br/> Participants: The sample is pregnant women age 18 or older who have been <br/> continuously abstinent from smoking from 28-32 weeks of pregnancy. <br/> Methods: The design of this study uses a treatment group and an historical <br/> control group. Women are recruited from prenatal clinics and at 34 weeks <br/> of pregnancy and are risk-assessed based on our model&AElig;s sources of <br/> motivation. Treatment group women are triaged to one of four levels of <br/> stepped-care, and receive at least one in-person and 4 telephone <br/> counseling sessions through the first 3 months postpartum. The <br/> intervention uses processes consistent with clinical practice and includes <br/> assessment of sources of motivation, risk profiling, triaging women to <br/> different levels of intervention intensity, and matching theory-based <br/> intervention strategies to the risk profile. Intervention strategies <br/> include motivational interviewing, enhancing self-efficacy, anticipating <br/> and planning for high risk parenting and social situations, and referrals <br/> for depression and weight control. Results: Outcomes are 1 and 3-month <br/> postpartum smoking resumption rates which will be compared using Chi <br/> square analyses. The study is in progress and preliminary findings will be <br/> presented.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:54:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:54:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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