Rehabilitation Training After Cerebral Ischemia Affects Astrocyte Production and Ameliorates Cognitve Impairment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159316
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Rehabilitation Training After Cerebral Ischemia Affects Astrocyte Production and Ameliorates Cognitve Impairment
Abstract:
Rehabilitation Training After Cerebral Ischemia Affects Astrocyte Production and Ameliorates Cognitve Impairment
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Briones, Tess, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Medical-Surgical Nursing, 845 S. Damen Ave., M/C 802, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:(312) 355-3142
Co-Authors:Julie Woods, BS, Research Coordinator; Magdalena Wadowska, BS, Graduate Research Assistant; and Magdalena Rogozinska, BS, Research Assistant
Changes in astrocyte production and cognitive impairment have been
well-documented consequences of CNS injury. Here we examined whether
astrocytic changes after cerebral ischemia can be influenced by
rehabilitation training and if these changes were associated with
cognitive improvement. Sixty-four adult male Wistar rats received either
ischemia or sham surgery. Within 3 days after surgery, animals in each
group were randomly assigned to either: complex environment housing (EC),
treadmill exercise (EX), or socially paired housing (controls). After 14
days of behavioral training, rats were tested for 12 days in the water
maze for: place learning (4 days) and non-spatial learning (4 days) tasks
with 2 days of rest in between blocks of testing. Immunohistochemical
results showed increased expression of reactive astrocytes in all ischemic
rats and in sham animals housed in EC compared to the sham EX and control
groups. When basic fibroblast growth factor (growth factor commonly
expressed in astrocytes) was examined, results showed that the pattern of
expression was similar to that of reactive astrocytes. Behavioral analyses
showed significantly shorter mean swim latencies in the spatial learning
tasks in animals assigned to the EC and EX groups compared to their SC
counterparts. However, significantly shorter mean swim latencies in the
non-spatial learning tasks were seen only in the ischemia EC and sham EC
groups compared to their EX and SC counterparts. Additionally, a
significant correlation was seen between increased astrocyte expression
and cognitive improvement. These results suggest that behavioral training
probably influenced the positive effects of ischemia-induced activation of
astrocytes and that the benefits of these astrocytic changes may have been
mediated by growth factor actions. Furthermore, it is possible that EC
housing was more effective in enhancing the recovery of complex cognitive
task. (Funded by NIH NR05260)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRehabilitation Training After Cerebral Ischemia Affects Astrocyte Production and Ameliorates Cognitve Impairmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159316-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Rehabilitation Training After Cerebral Ischemia Affects Astrocyte Production and Ameliorates Cognitve Impairment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Briones, Tess, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Medical-Surgical Nursing, 845 S. Damen Ave., M/C 802, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(312) 355-3142</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tbriones@uic.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Julie Woods, BS, Research Coordinator; Magdalena Wadowska, BS, Graduate Research Assistant; and Magdalena Rogozinska, BS, Research Assistant</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Changes in astrocyte production and cognitive impairment have been <br/> well-documented consequences of CNS injury. Here we examined whether <br/> astrocytic changes after cerebral ischemia can be influenced by <br/> rehabilitation training and if these changes were associated with <br/> cognitive improvement. Sixty-four adult male Wistar rats received either <br/> ischemia or sham surgery. Within 3 days after surgery, animals in each <br/> group were randomly assigned to either: complex environment housing (EC), <br/> treadmill exercise (EX), or socially paired housing (controls). After 14 <br/> days of behavioral training, rats were tested for 12 days in the water <br/> maze for: place learning (4 days) and non-spatial learning (4 days) tasks <br/> with 2 days of rest in between blocks of testing. Immunohistochemical <br/> results showed increased expression of reactive astrocytes in all ischemic <br/> rats and in sham animals housed in EC compared to the sham EX and control <br/> groups. When basic fibroblast growth factor (growth factor commonly <br/> expressed in astrocytes) was examined, results showed that the pattern of <br/> expression was similar to that of reactive astrocytes. Behavioral analyses <br/> showed significantly shorter mean swim latencies in the spatial learning <br/> tasks in animals assigned to the EC and EX groups compared to their SC <br/> counterparts. However, significantly shorter mean swim latencies in the <br/> non-spatial learning tasks were seen only in the ischemia EC and sham EC <br/> groups compared to their EX and SC counterparts. Additionally, a <br/> significant correlation was seen between increased astrocyte expression <br/> and cognitive improvement. These results suggest that behavioral training <br/> probably influenced the positive effects of ischemia-induced activation of <br/> astrocytes and that the benefits of these astrocytic changes may have been <br/> mediated by growth factor actions. Furthermore, it is possible that EC <br/> housing was more effective in enhancing the recovery of complex cognitive <br/> task. (Funded by NIH NR05260)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:54:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:54:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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