Specific Stressors and the Specific Stress Symptoms They Elicit in School-age Children

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159317
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Specific Stressors and the Specific Stress Symptoms They Elicit in School-age Children
Abstract:
Specific Stressors and the Specific Stress Symptoms They Elicit in School-age Children
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Brooks, Danielle
P.I. Institution Name:Ohio State University
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 1585 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA
Contact Telephone:(740)350-2827
Problem. School-age children experience common, everyday stressors and also atypical, larger-scale stressors. Lazarus defines stressors as external and/or internal demands that are appraised as taxing or exceeding the resources of the person. Sources of stress may differ for children from rural and urban settings. Stress symptoms are a direct result of stressors that are either subtle or dramatic, but perceptible, cognitive, emotional, and physical responses in the body. Very few investigators have intentionally tested for specificity relations between particular stressors and particular symptoms. Such research is necessary to better understand the role of stress in the etiology of developmental psychopathology. Purpose. The purpose of this study, based on LazarusÆ stress-coping theory, is to characterize the relationships between specific stressors and the specific stress symptoms they elicit in school-age children. Method. Using a retrospective, cross-sectional design, 128 children, grades 3-6, from a rural (n=64) and urban (n=64) elementary school will complete the "Feel Bad Scale" in which they describe a recent stressor they have experienced and the "Pediatric Symptoms Checklist" (PSC) to measure stress symptoms. The PSC is a 35-item instrument that includes emotions, behaviors, and patterns that may be a result of stress. Children score each as occurring never, sometimes, or often. Compared with the Clinicians' Global Assessment Scale, the PSC has 79% agreement, 95% sensitivity, and 68% specificity for middle income children. Analysis. Several hypotheses of relationships among type, level of exposure, frequency, currency, severity of stressors, stress symptoms, gender and geographic area will be tested with Pearson correlations, t-tests, or one-way ANOVA. Results will be available by April, 2005. Clinical Significance. The findings will be useful to school and clinical pediatric nurses who may diagnose and manage children with stress-related problems or teach effective coping strategies to minimize symptoms in the development of psychiatric disorders and stress-related diseases.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSpecific Stressors and the Specific Stress Symptoms They Elicit in School-age Childrenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159317-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Specific Stressors and the Specific Stress Symptoms They Elicit in School-age Children</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brooks, Danielle</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ohio State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 1585 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(740)350-2827</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">brooks.304@osu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem. School-age children experience common, everyday stressors and also atypical, larger-scale stressors. Lazarus defines stressors as external and/or internal demands that are appraised as taxing or exceeding the resources of the person. Sources of stress may differ for children from rural and urban settings. Stress symptoms are a direct result of stressors that are either subtle or dramatic, but perceptible, cognitive, emotional, and physical responses in the body. Very few investigators have intentionally tested for specificity relations between particular stressors and particular symptoms. Such research is necessary to better understand the role of stress in the etiology of developmental psychopathology. Purpose. The purpose of this study, based on Lazarus&AElig; stress-coping theory, is to characterize the relationships between specific stressors and the specific stress symptoms they elicit in school-age children. Method. Using a retrospective, cross-sectional design, 128 children, grades 3-6, from a rural (n=64) and urban (n=64) elementary school will complete the &quot;Feel Bad Scale&quot; in which they describe a recent stressor they have experienced and the &quot;Pediatric Symptoms Checklist&quot; (PSC) to measure stress symptoms. The PSC is a 35-item instrument that includes emotions, behaviors, and patterns that may be a result of stress. Children score each as occurring never, sometimes, or often. Compared with the Clinicians' Global Assessment Scale, the PSC has 79% agreement, 95% sensitivity, and 68% specificity for middle income children. Analysis. Several hypotheses of relationships among type, level of exposure, frequency, currency, severity of stressors, stress symptoms, gender and geographic area will be tested with Pearson correlations, t-tests, or one-way ANOVA. Results will be available by April, 2005. Clinical Significance. The findings will be useful to school and clinical pediatric nurses who may diagnose and manage children with stress-related problems or teach effective coping strategies to minimize symptoms in the development of psychiatric disorders and stress-related diseases.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:54:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:54:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.