2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159318
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Measuring Physical Fitness in Adults: Nurse Practitioner Practices
Abstract:
Measuring Physical Fitness in Adults: Nurse Practitioner Practices
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Buchholz, Susan, PhD, ANP, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Purdue University-Calumet
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 2200 169th Street X-10, Hammond, IN, 46323, USA
Contact Telephone:(219) 989-2833
Co-Authors:Janet Purath, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor
Lack of physical activity contributes to a significant level of
chronic diseases in the United States. Presently, only 33% of adults in
the country engage in the recommended amount of moderate or vigorous
physical activity. In order to increase participation in physical
activity, it is important for adult nurse practitioners (ANPs) to discuss
physical activity participation with patients. In addition to providing
physical activity counseling, it would be useful if ANPs could provide
physical fitness assessment, which gives an objective and valid assessment
of the results of having engaged in physical activity. To date, minimal
research has been done that examines how ANPs measure physical fitness in
their patients. The purpose of this study is to examine how ANPs counsel
and assess for physical activity practices, as well as utilize physical
fitness measure with their adult patients. A representative group of ANPs
(N=1500) who are members of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners
have been randomly selected to participate in this nonexperimental design
study. Information is being gathered which includes demographic and
practice setting data, as well as physical activity and physical fitness
assessment and counseling practices. The first five sections of this
survey are a replication of a 1997 nationally distributed questionnaire of
ANPs, conducted by Burns and colleagues. In order to explore physical
fitness measures, the researchers added a sixth section to include more
extensive questioning related to how nurse practitioners measure physical
fitness. A letter discussing the questionnaire along with a URL to access
the questionnaire has been mailed to ANPs. Typing in the URL and using an
individualized password directly link the subject to a web-based
questionnaire. Descriptive, bivariate and regression statistics will be
used to analyze the data. This study will provide a framework for a future
physical activity and physical fitness intervention project.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeasuring Physical Fitness in Adults: Nurse Practitioner Practicesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159318-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Measuring Physical Fitness in Adults: Nurse Practitioner Practices</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Buchholz, Susan, PhD, ANP, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Purdue University-Calumet</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 2200 169th Street X-10, Hammond, IN, 46323, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(219) 989-2833</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">buchholz@calumet.purdue.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Janet Purath, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Lack of physical activity contributes to a significant level of <br/> chronic diseases in the United States. Presently, only 33% of adults in <br/> the country engage in the recommended amount of moderate or vigorous <br/> physical activity. In order to increase participation in physical <br/> activity, it is important for adult nurse practitioners (ANPs) to discuss <br/> physical activity participation with patients. In addition to providing <br/> physical activity counseling, it would be useful if ANPs could provide <br/> physical fitness assessment, which gives an objective and valid assessment <br/> of the results of having engaged in physical activity. To date, minimal <br/> research has been done that examines how ANPs measure physical fitness in <br/> their patients. The purpose of this study is to examine how ANPs counsel <br/> and assess for physical activity practices, as well as utilize physical <br/> fitness measure with their adult patients. A representative group of ANPs <br/> (N=1500) who are members of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners <br/> have been randomly selected to participate in this nonexperimental design <br/> study. Information is being gathered which includes demographic and <br/> practice setting data, as well as physical activity and physical fitness <br/> assessment and counseling practices. The first five sections of this <br/> survey are a replication of a 1997 nationally distributed questionnaire of <br/> ANPs, conducted by Burns and colleagues. In order to explore physical <br/> fitness measures, the researchers added a sixth section to include more <br/> extensive questioning related to how nurse practitioners measure physical <br/> fitness. A letter discussing the questionnaire along with a URL to access <br/> the questionnaire has been mailed to ANPs. Typing in the URL and using an <br/> individualized password directly link the subject to a web-based <br/> questionnaire. Descriptive, bivariate and regression statistics will be <br/> used to analyze the data. This study will provide a framework for a future <br/> physical activity and physical fitness intervention project.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:54:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:54:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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