Bone Mineral Density and Hormone Replacement Therapy Among a Select Group of Religious Sisters

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159319
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Bone Mineral Density and Hormone Replacement Therapy Among a Select Group of Religious Sisters
Abstract:
Bone Mineral Density and Hormone Replacement Therapy Among a Select Group of Religious Sisters
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Buhl, Anne, Co-Presenter and Study Contact
P.I. Institution Name:Winona State University
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 903 DC Court SE, Pine Island, MN, 55963, USA
Contact Telephone:(507) 255-2909
Co-Authors:Shannon Huber, Co-Presenter and Allison Meisheid, Co-Presenter
Recent questions have been raised about the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT), especially in relation to bone mineral density (BMD). Purposes of this study were to determine the BMD of a group of religious sisters and to explore the differences in use of HRT for those with normal BMD and those with BMD levels indicative of osteopenia and osteoporosis. The epidemiological Web of Causation served as a framework for this study. It is a secondary analysis of the database established by Bautch and Gaspar (2003) for their study of health promotion practices and disease occurrences among a select group of religious sisters from the Midwestern United States. The homogeneity of the sample provided control of lifestyle variables (i.e. celibacy, alcohol use and smoking) that may be confounding. Data from the primary study for the years 2000 through 2003 were used for this study. Variables studied included demographic variables and the BMD and use of HRT as recorded on the chart. One hundred fifty subjects had complete data for analysis of this study. The number of BMD results recorded on the chart steadily increased over the 4 years with 42 subjects having BMD reported in 2003. An ANOVA indicated that there was a significant difference between the use of HRT and the results of the BMD (F=2.927; p=.05). Those subjects with normal BMD (x=11.12; sd 17.24) results had been taking HRT longer than those with osteopenia (x=5.98; sd 13.53) and osteoporosis (4.41; sd=10.89). Despite the recent negative press in regards to HRT the noted differences in the mean number of months of taking a HRT for the three levels of BMD results (normal, osteopenia and osteoporosis) indicates need for further exploration of these variables. Further exploration of other variables associated with these differences is essential. (Poster Presentation)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBone Mineral Density and Hormone Replacement Therapy Among a Select Group of Religious Sistersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159319-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Bone Mineral Density and Hormone Replacement Therapy Among a Select Group of Religious Sisters</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Buhl, Anne, Co-Presenter and Study Contact</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Winona State University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 903 DC Court SE, Pine Island, MN, 55963, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(507) 255-2909</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">buhl.anne@mayo.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Shannon Huber, Co-Presenter and Allison Meisheid, Co-Presenter</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Recent questions have been raised about the use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT), especially in relation to bone mineral density (BMD). Purposes of this study were to determine the BMD of a group of religious sisters and to explore the differences in use of HRT for those with normal BMD and those with BMD levels indicative of osteopenia and osteoporosis. The epidemiological Web of Causation served as a framework for this study. It is a secondary analysis of the database established by Bautch and Gaspar (2003) for their study of health promotion practices and disease occurrences among a select group of religious sisters from the Midwestern United States. The homogeneity of the sample provided control of lifestyle variables (i.e. celibacy, alcohol use and smoking) that may be confounding. Data from the primary study for the years 2000 through 2003 were used for this study. Variables studied included demographic variables and the BMD and use of HRT as recorded on the chart. One hundred fifty subjects had complete data for analysis of this study. The number of BMD results recorded on the chart steadily increased over the 4 years with 42 subjects having BMD reported in 2003. An ANOVA indicated that there was a significant difference between the use of HRT and the results of the BMD (F=2.927; p=.05). Those subjects with normal BMD (x=11.12; sd 17.24) results had been taking HRT longer than those with osteopenia (x=5.98; sd 13.53) and osteoporosis (4.41; sd=10.89). Despite the recent negative press in regards to HRT the noted differences in the mean number of months of taking a HRT for the three levels of BMD results (normal, osteopenia and osteoporosis) indicates need for further exploration of these variables. Further exploration of other variables associated with these differences is essential. (Poster Presentation)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:54:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:54:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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