2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/159320
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses at risk in the workplace: Tuberculosis in Zambia
Abstract:
Nurses at risk in the workplace: Tuberculosis in Zambia
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2005
Author:Chanda, Dorothy, MPH, BscN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Zambia, Post Basic Nursing Dept.
Title:Lecturer
Contact Address:School of Medicine, P. O. Box 50110, Lusaka, 10101, Zambia
Contact Telephone:260-1-097847323 ( cell)
Co-Authors:Ruth Ludwick, PhD, RN, C, CNS
Purpose: This study examined community and service factors that
contribute to the high prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) among nurses in
Lusaka, Zambia. Framework: An epidemiological framework informed this
study as the Central Board of Health (CBOH) identified TB as a major
illness among nurses. Between 1982 and 1984 only 8 nurses suffered and
were successfully treated for TB, but between 1993 and 1995, when the
nurse population decreased from 1045 to 849, 64 nurses died from TB. By
1997, 114 nurses died from TB leaving a nurses population of 802.
Subjects: One-hundred and forty-four nurses who worked in a large teaching
hospital were enlisted as subjects using a systematic random sampling
technique. Methods: Data for this cross-sectional study were obtained
using a self-administered interview schedule, observation of infection
prevention measures in clinical areas, culturing equipment and patientsÆ
immediate environment, and focus group discussions. Results: The
prevalence of TB among subjects was 11.11%. Cultures isolated
mycobacterium tuberculosis from patients' immediate environments and
nursing care equipment. Numerous other factors e.g. poor ventilation on
unit-admission days, night shift assignment, and inadequate knowledge on
TB updates were found to be associated with TB among nurses. The study
also showed that BCG administration, whether in childhood or before
entering nurse-training, did not guarantee protection against TB for
nurses. Conclusion: The study demonstrates how numerous factors
synergistically contribute to nurses acquiring TB. Primary preventive
measures required that nurses be updated on the latest issues on
tuberculosis control and that the stigma of TB and its relationship to HIV
needed to be addressed. Since the study was completed the Zambia Nurses
Association (ZNA) has set-up an in-country HIV-AIDS project encouraging
nurses to opt for Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT). Nurses who opt
for VCT now receive Isoniazid and also anti-retroviral therapies if they
are HIV positive.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses at risk in the workplace: Tuberculosis in Zambiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/159320-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurses at risk in the workplace: Tuberculosis in Zambia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chanda, Dorothy, MPH, BscN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Zambia, Post Basic Nursing Dept.</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Lecturer</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Medicine, P. O. Box 50110, Lusaka, 10101, Zambia</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">260-1-097847323 ( cell)</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dchandaa@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ruth Ludwick, PhD, RN, C, CNS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: This study examined community and service factors that <br/> contribute to the high prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) among nurses in <br/> Lusaka, Zambia. Framework: An epidemiological framework informed this <br/> study as the Central Board of Health (CBOH) identified TB as a major <br/> illness among nurses. Between 1982 and 1984 only 8 nurses suffered and <br/> were successfully treated for TB, but between 1993 and 1995, when the <br/> nurse population decreased from 1045 to 849, 64 nurses died from TB. By <br/> 1997, 114 nurses died from TB leaving a nurses population of 802. <br/> Subjects: One-hundred and forty-four nurses who worked in a large teaching <br/> hospital were enlisted as subjects using a systematic random sampling <br/> technique. Methods: Data for this cross-sectional study were obtained <br/> using a self-administered interview schedule, observation of infection <br/> prevention measures in clinical areas, culturing equipment and patients&AElig; <br/> immediate environment, and focus group discussions. Results: The <br/> prevalence of TB among subjects was 11.11%. Cultures isolated <br/> mycobacterium tuberculosis from patients' immediate environments and <br/> nursing care equipment. Numerous other factors e.g. poor ventilation on <br/> unit-admission days, night shift assignment, and inadequate knowledge on <br/> TB updates were found to be associated with TB among nurses. The study <br/> also showed that BCG administration, whether in childhood or before <br/> entering nurse-training, did not guarantee protection against TB for <br/> nurses. Conclusion: The study demonstrates how numerous factors <br/> synergistically contribute to nurses acquiring TB. Primary preventive <br/> measures required that nurses be updated on the latest issues on <br/> tuberculosis control and that the stigma of TB and its relationship to HIV <br/> needed to be addressed. Since the study was completed the Zambia Nurses <br/> Association (ZNA) has set-up an in-country HIV-AIDS project encouraging <br/> nurses to opt for Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT). Nurses who opt <br/> for VCT now receive Isoniazid and also anti-retroviral therapies if they <br/> are HIV positive.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T21:54:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T21:54:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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